(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "George C. Dobson's new school for the banjo"


ALSO, METHOD FOR PLAYING THE BANJO AT SIGHT, 

WITHOUT STUDY. 

' * . * 

In addition to the above, are new instructions, valuable information concerning the instrument, together with new Banjo music; 
never before published, composed, selected, and arranged by the author. 



GEO. C. DOBSON'S TESTIMONIALS AS PERFORMER 
AND TEACHER. 

From the N". T. Clipper. 
Geo. C. Dobson.one of the well-known Dobson Brothers, of Banjo celebrity, closed a 
week's engagement at the City Museum Theatre, Philadelphia, on the lOht inst. We were 
present on the 9th, when Mr." Dobson performed a variety of popular airs on the Banjo, 
to the delight of the audience present. It was the first time we had listened to the playing 
of this gentleman, although we have heard nearly, if not quite all, the great players in 
this country. We have no hesitation in pronouncing him, in our opinion, equal to any 
other player in America ; his touch is easy, graceful and true ; he produces a pure tone, 
whether in the higher or lower register, and in subdued passages his notes are as clear 
and musical as those given out by the light Guitar when touched by the fingers of a skill- 
ful player ; his execution is remarkable, his fingers running all over the Banjo with an 
acuracy which few other players have ever attained. In a word, Geo. C. Dobson is a 
master of the instrument, and, in our judgment, is excelled by no other player. The 
audience were profuse in their applause, and gave him the compliment of an encore, 
lie appears in white face. 



From the Boston Herald. 
Mr. Geo. C. Dobson 's performance on the Banjo at the St. James Theatre was the finest 
we ever had the pleasure of listening to. 



From the Daily Courant, Hartford Conn. 
Mr. Geo. C. Dobson, the well known Banjoist, favored us with a specimen of his skill 
on the Banjo, in a style and manner entirely different from anything we have heard on 
that instrument. The New York Herald says " he is universally acknowledged to be 
the best performer on the Banjo in the world." His style of instruction is by a new, sim- 
ple and original method, which is thoroughly explained at the first lesson. 

Boston Daily Globe. 
Mr. Dobson's style of playing is very refined, and his refinement and facility of style Is 
imparted successfully to his pupils. 

Boston. Daily News. -.'.'-. 

Being a lover of music. I thought it might not be uninteresting to your many readers who 
have a like taste, to know of the pleasure experienced by the writer a short time since in vis- 
iting the rooms of Prot. George C. Dobson, at 1139 Washington Street. As we were passing 



the residence of the professor we met him on the walk, and having a slight acquaintance- 
with him, on invitation, accompanied him to his music room, which of itself is a perfect 
gem, its walls are hung with pictures rare and beautiful, and all the surroundings are so 
homelike, that one forgets he is in the presenee of so gifted an artist. Prof. Dobson's. 
great forte is in teaching the Banjo and Guitar, and it was to listen to his performance of 
selections from Mendelssohn and the operas that we had accepted his invitation. We had 
heard a great deal about this truly great player and teacher of these instruments, but we 
were wholly unprepared for such a display of talent : we were forced to acknowledge a 
beauty and grandeur about his performance, not easily excelled by any other. From the- 
soft low notes as of the aeolian harp, >to the rapturous cadence of a grand piano, he would! 
glide with ease and grace, holding us spell-bound. We left the artist with a feeling that 
our hearts were more closely knit together by the enchanting witchery of music. We- 
were satisfied with Mr. Dobson, and only wished ourselves a little way back in early life,, 
that we might take lessons of such a teacher, and on such instruments as we had never 
before known to appreciate ; and we would advise all our young friends, in particular, to. 
avail themselves of the advantage of instruction, by Prof. George C. Dobson, at 1I39> 
Washington Street. Yours truly , Selpatis, Boston. 

Testimonials from Professional Pupils now on the Stage. 

Boston Theatre, July 15, 1871. 
Mb, William Ashcrott presents his compliments to Mr. Geo. C. Dobson for his care- 
ful attention and kindness, during his term of instruction on the Banjo. 



Geo. C. Dobson, Esq. : 

Dear Sir, — I thank you kindly for all the pains and attention you have given me on the- 
Banjo, and can assure you I have profited by your instruction. You are at liberty to use: 
my name-as a recommendation. Very respectfully, Lotta. 

Howard Variety Theatre, Boston, Mass. 
Mr. Geo. C. Dobson is the best teacher and performer on the Banjo. I received lessons- 
from him, and use one of his instruments. Sam Devere. 



St. James Theatre. 
Geo. C. Dobson, — Having tried all Banjos by recognized makers, I pronounce yours the 
best for stage or parlor use. I am using one of them In preference to all others. I ac- 
knowledge you a perfect master of the instrument, your method, being easy, sure and 
correct. . Billy Carter. 



i *.\ m. r \_ jw 



2 DEC. 20,1900 

Abbreviations 12 

A Dictionary of Musical Terms 19 

Amusement 25 

Amusement Jig 30 

Appogiatura, or Grace Note 14 

A Starry Night for a Kamble 65 

Barre Polka , 34 

Bar tie News 70 

IBennie Jig. No. 1 47 

IBennie Jig. No- 2 55 

FJeauery Walk Around 26 

'Blue Bells of Scotland 31 

IBudd Polka _ 33 



INDEX* 



'Chords „ 18 

'Chromatic Scale _ „„_^ _ .18 

(Charley Brick wood's Favorite iPol'icu . ,...'. 46 

'Clayville Polka \ r _. 50 

Clog Hornpipe . .. 51 

Clog Hornpipe „.. ; . 51 

Coming Through the Eye 48 

IDon't you wish you Could ...„ .63 

Dutchman's Jig . 27 

.Early Spring Polka 37 

Exercises _ . 22 

.Exercise -25 

;Exercise _ ...,„.. 30 

Exercise 67 

.Exercise t „ 21 

jExercise in Barre Chords . 32 

.Fannie's Waltz 27 

Fairy Waltz. No* 1 27 

xFairy Waltz. No. 2 43 

F. 11. Bond Schotische 41 

Get out of the Wilderness 30 

harmonics 33 

iHow to Hold the Banjo 21 

.How to Tune the Baujo to produce the tones as 
shown in the Diagram on the preceeding page. 21 

VHow to Put a head on a Banjo 23 

.Home, Sweet Home, (with Variations.) 44 

.Home, Sweet Home, (S,mg and Acct.) 72 



How to clean a soiled Banjo head without remov- 
ing it ^. 23 

Improved Diagram of the Finger-board 36 

Intervals . 15 

Irish Jig 51 

Jig Exercise 26 

Joe's Jig 69 

Left Hand Fingering 21 

Lizzie Poika 26 

May Polka 37 

Melody with Accompaniment........ 71 

Method for playing the Banjo at sight, without 

Study 66 

Minor Scales 17 

M iuor Jig i 42 

My Love's a Lassie O! 26 

Niagara Falls Polka 39 

Okete Walla's Jig 38 

On Yonder Rock 50 

Over There. (Banjo Song.) 52 

Philadelphia Favorite .- 49 

Rattlesnake Jig 47 

Relative Value of Notes 3 

Right and Left Hand Fingering... 22 

Rickett's Drum' Solo . - 58 

Robinson Crusoe - -- 68 

Rural Polka r. 39 

Selecting and Adjusting the Proper Strings 20 

Sharps and Flats... 8 

Shells we Gathered Years Ago. 64 

Shoo Fly 70 

Signs for Right Hand Fingering, in Picking, or 

Guitar Style 21 

Simple Accompaniment Chords. 25 

Simple Accompaniment and Chords. — 31 

Slur Waltz -. — 29 

Spanish Retreat. 43 

stroke Playing .- — 22 

.Star Spangled Banner .__„-.. .. 49 



Strauss Thousand and one Nights Waltz 53 

Stroke March 60 

Table of the Notes and their Proportions 4 

The Staff. 4 

The Rests 5 

The Scale 7 

The Tones as represented on the Staff, produced 

on the Five Open Strings 20 

The Rule for Fretting the Banjo 22 

The Care of the Instrument 23 

The Proper Dimensions for Constructing a Banjo 24 
Th< j Natural Key of the Banjo, (A Major.) 

Explaned 24 

The Scale of A Major in Sections 24 

The Major Scale in A 25 

The Major Scale in E 30 

The Barre 32 

The Major Scale inD 35 

The Major Scale in G 35 

The Major Scale in C 35 

The Major Scale in F 35 

The Major Scale in B|2 35 

The Alice Polka 40 

The Oboe Clog 41 

The Key • • • • 66 

The Banjo on My Knee 69 

The Young Man from Canorsey 69 

Thoughtful Mazurka 43 

There's a Merry Welcome 43 

Those Good Old Days 70 

Time K» 

Transposition of the Keys or Scale 16 

Up in de Mountains 28 

Valliance Polka Militaire 56. 

Wake up Jig 28 

Walk Around 47 

Wait till the Moonlight Falls on the Water 61 

Waltz 70 

Yankee Doodle 27 

Yango Jig 28 

Yankee Doodle • 67 



RUDIMENTS OF MUSIC 



*or.f£ A ,o 



Relative Value of Notes. 

Every musical sound is expressed by characters called Notes j 
and, as these sounds may be long or short, their duration is indicated 
by a particular form of the note. 

The longest sounds are designated by this character, i5?, which is 
called a Whole Note, the duration or time of which is determined by 
counting /om/, or making four beats by movements of the hand or 
foot. When measured by the hand, the direction is made in the fol- 
lowing order: — down, left, right, up. 

A sound continued but half the time, that is while counting two, 
or making two beats, is expressed by a Half Note, the stem of which 
may be turned either upward or downward, thus : I & . 

A Quarter Note, the time of which is but one beat, is made 
thus : J or f with the stem either way. 

All notes of shorter duration are expressed by bars across the 
stems, thus : Eighth Note, \ or J. 



A Sixteenth Note, thus: R, or tf 

R P 
A Thirty-Second Note, thus: R or / 



When several notes of the same character follow in succession,, 
the bars are usually connected in this manner. Eighth notes with one- 
bar, thus: j-g J72 

Sixteenth notes with two bars, thus : Z3 R-3 

4 4 4 4 4 

Thirty- second notes with three bars, thus : ta 1 ; ! ! 

4 4 4 4 4 4 

Often we find eighth and sixteenth notes connected in this manner,, 

r& rR"Ti 

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 

And various other combinations, as follows ; 

R rS R FT=, 

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 44 4 



4 



11 



RUDIMENTS OF MUSIC. 
Table op the Notes and their Propoktions. 



One whole note, 
is equal to two half notes, 



is equal to four quarter notes, ... 

is equal to eight eighth notes, - 

is equal to sixteen sixteenth notes, - 

is equal to thirty-two thirty-second notes, 



the Staff. 

As every note has a definite tone or pitch, being either high or low, 
the sound is indicated by its position upon a staff, which consists of 
five parallel lines, and their intermediate spaces, the underline being 
■ called the first line, and the lowest space the first space. 



The Staff. 



Tlfthlin*. 

Fourth line. 

Third line. 
t Second line, 
.First line. 



Fourth space. 
Third space. 
Second space. 
First space. 



A note is on the line when the line passes through it, and on the 
;-space when between the fines. 



On the 2d. line. 



On the 3d. ipace. 



! 




S2 











J 



i i i 



J=7 



J J 



■■■ 



i i i 



... 



=, s 



i i i i i i i ii 



Tnai 



1 1 1 1 j 



When more than five lines are required to designate any particu- 
lar note that is too high or two low to be represented upon the staff", 
we use small lines both above and below the staff. These lines aro 
called Leger Lines, and are designated as the first leger line above, 
secoud leger line above, &c, or first leger line below, second leger 
line?below, &c. 

The first note above the staff is said to be upon the space above. 



Spaces; above. 



Leger Hues above. 



E 



Xecer lines below. 



Spaces below. 



The first sate below, the -staff is said to be upon the space below. 



RUDIMENTS OF MUSIC. 



All Staffs, commence with a character called a Clef. 

There are two clefs in common use. The Treble, or G Clef jfe 

which is used for the right hand in Piano-Forte or Melodeon music, 
also for all music written for the Violin, Guitar, Flute, Banjo, Accor- 

deon, Flageolet, Fife and Clarionet. The Bass or F Clef, ^/- is used 

for the left hand in Piano-Forte or Melodeon music, also for the Vio- 
loncello, Double Bass, &c. When music is written for two or more 
instruments or voices, the staves are connected by a Brace. 

A duet for two violins, or for Flute and Violin, would be connect 
ed thus : — 



S 



i 



Music for the Piano-Forte or Melodeon, thus:— 




The Rests. 

Every note has its corresponding Eest, denoting silence, or a stop 
they are not placed upon any particular line or space of the staff, but 
in such order as best accomodates the eye,— sometimes being above the 
staff and sometimes beneath. 

A whole rest, corresponding with the whole note in respect to 
time, is situated under the fourth line. A half rest is situated above 
the third line. A quarter rest turns to the right. An eighth rest turns 
to the left, . _ 



The use of Notes and their Corresponding Bests, 




Whole Rest. 



Half Rest. 



Quarter Rest. 



221 



-s>- 



1 



m 



* 



2 



I 



Eighth Rest. 



Sixteenth Rest. Thirty-second Rest. 



i 



$ 



4 



I 



6 



A Tie - — - above or below two or more notes that have the same 
situation upon the staff, shows that they are to be performed as one 
note, the duration of which is equal to the time of all combined. 



RUDIMENTS OF MUSIC. 

When more than one bar rest is required, it is indicated as follows : 



m 



: ^ is equivalent to one note, the time of which is eight 



"2 — beats. 



3 



sr 



is equivalent to one note, the time of which is 
seven beats. 



m 



?2=^ZZ 



§ 



2Z=Zt 



is equivalent to one note of five beats, 



is equivalent to one note of six beats, 



By combinations of this sort we can express a sound of any dura 
tion required. 

A dot following a note or rest makes it half as long again. 



i 




is equal to 



Jlp^i 1 



is equal to 



-.■ztzsL 



I 



8 



is equal to 



•Rests are never tied, but are arranged one after the other until 
fthe required time is made up, thus: — 



m 



W 



t 



± 



SI 



I3EI 



IE t= 3EEEI 



J^HEzEj 



2 bars. 3 bars. 4 bars. 5 bars. 6 bars. 7 bars. 8 bars. 9 bars. 

Two dots placed after a note, or rest makes it three fourths longer 
than its actual length, thus : 




t-8-- is equal to - g— gH^ j : 



Ml 



is equal to - gi-, 



£t 



When the slur or tie is placed over or under any combination of 
notes that are on different lines and spaces, it signifies that they must 
be performed in a smooth and connected manner, which is called a 
Legato movement, and is written thus : — 



' ' ' J- 1^-4 1— I ■_■ _« • 



-w 

Dots placed above or below any series of notes indicate the op- 
posite style of playing, which is termed Staccato, signifying in a 
marked and distinct style, represented as follows : — 

Written. Played. 



f- 



ff- 7 1 7 ^ -^j - ^^ry 8 ?-* -?"! 

TZ J r . —j IJ j j. 1 



When marked in this manner, each note must be made particu- 
larly short, and very distinct. 

Written. Played. 

■■f — 









RUDIMENTS OF MUSIC. 



We frequently find the Legato and Staccato movements combined, 
which mostly occurs in music written for the violin, and is played by 
detaching the notes with the movement of the bow in one direc tion, 
either up or down. 




li^Efel 



A Triplet is a group of three notes played in the time of two. 
A figure 3 is always placed over or under a triplet. 



A figure 6 signifies that six are to be played in the time of four. 



pill 



Other combinations of notes are made, and the number marked 
above them, thus : 

Seven to be played in the ti me of four. 

7 




Nine to be played in the time of eight, &c, 




The Scale. 

Notes are named after the first seven letters of the Alphabet,. 
A, B, C,D, E, F, G, When these notes follow in regular succession, 
they form what is called a Scale. It will be observed that notes of 
the same name or letter occur several times in a regular scale, but air- 
ways in a different position on the staff. 



The Scale. 



i 



A B 



D 



E 



F 



B 



f 



1 



C D 



E 



B 



D 



8 



2d. leger line below. 



1^2 



RUDIMENTS OP MUSIC. 
C 



I 



5 



§ 



Second space. 1st leger line above. , ., "*;. . , 

* 1st leger line below. 



V- 



Third space. 2d leger line above. Space below. Fourth line. D, &c, 
The notes upon the lines are 



i 



A Double Shaep raises a note a Whole tone. 



~>9- A Double Flat lowers a note a whole tone, 



-J!}- — A Natural contradicts a flat or sharp. 



EG B D . P 

The notes upon the spaces spell the word Face. 



fe 



m 



E 



Sharps and Flats. 

The pitch of any note may be changed by prefixing any of the 
{following characters. 



A Sharp before a note raises it a Semitone. 



-9 A Flat before a note lowers it a Semitone. 



- 1| 'r— or - fp- or restores the single flat or sharp . 



Flats or Sharps placed at the commencement of a piece of music 
affect every note throughout the piece upon the lines and spaces 
where they are situated ; also, any other notes of the same letter up- 
on the staff. Any flat or sharp that is not so situated is called an 
Accidental. 



:§. 



Ffl and F# C# and Cfl and Ci 



m*^^ 



:i 



Here every F and C are to be made sharp, no matter what their 
situation upon the staff. 

Bb and Biz and Bfe 



i 



When flats are situated in the same position, the effect is the same 
as that of the sharp. 



RUDIMENTS OF MUSIC. 



9 



All music is divided into equal portions of time by perpendicular 
lines called Bars, and the music between any two bars is called a 
Measure. Wtaeu an accidental sharp, flat or natural is prefixed to 
a note, all the following notes of the same name contained in the 
measure are afiected by it, thus : — 



Example of the Sharp. 




Written, 



Played. 



Example of the Flat, 



^E£EfeE f£S£ 




Example of the Natural. 



i^!gg||siilgll^] 



When the last note of a measure is influenced by an accidental 
flat, sharp or natural, if the next measure should commence with the 
same note it is also affected likewise, thus : — 



Written. 



Played. 






Written. Played. 

Sharps and flats before a piece of music are called the Signature. 



Where the Siguature is r~fr~fft [~~ ^~ffIT" 



One sharp. Two sharps. Three sharps. Four sharp. 



m 



that sharp is always f fc fcg fcod 

Five sharps. Six sharps. Seven sharps. 



FCGDA 



Where the Signature is 



that flat is always 



FCGDAE FCGDAEB 

One flat. Two flats. Three flats. Fonr flats 



£ ii§E Efig 



BE 



BEA 



BEAD 



Five flats. Six flats. Seven flats. 



BEADG 






BE AD G C 



B EA DGCF 



Thus it will be seen that every note can be made sharp or flat ; 
and therefore the signature which determines a key, may contain seven 
sharps or flats. 



10 



KUDIMENTS OF MUSIC. 



Time. 

By Common Time, which is expressed by these characters^orjp 

and sometimes by the figures ^ or 3t etc., we understand that each 

measure contains music to the value of four beats, or one semibreve, 
which is made up in time by any combination of notes or rests, thus : 



fe 



-fa- 




Count 1, 2, 3,4, 1, 2, 3,4. 



7* 



-*-*=* r-+-i — I 



1, 2, 3, 4, 1, 2, 3, 4, 




Count 1, 



3, 4, i, 2, 4, 4, 



The various kinds of Time are indicated by the following figures. 
The upper figure indicates the number of notes to a measure, and the 
under one the kind of notes. 



Common Time. Three-four Time. Two-four. 



Three-eight. 



1 



3= 



j£ 



4 



^ 



£ 



Four-fourth notes. Three-fourth notes. 



Six-eight. 



Nine-eight. Twelve-eight. Common Time. 



i 



S 



9 



-8- 



+2: 



S: 



:rE r E 



This mark > is used to indicate a particular accent or stress upon 
a note. Common time, and all other kinds expressed by the even 

5- "S- 3- 

numbers 5 2 5 * c v mus t be accented upon the beginning and 
middle of the measure, thus : 



ppfe^f^ 






i 



^g^ 



- s ?- 



•i — y-T-f i. ! f — i* 



t=£ftt: 



:£=« 



*-*{-*-*} 



ii 



i 



4— •- 



^-^-*-2zS=?=?ee; •- 



-# — •- 



X_|_- 



HI 



RUDIMENTS OF MUSIC. 



11 



These accents are not marked, but are to be understood. ; it is only 
•when particular force or stress is required to be given to a note that it 

3: 3: jut 

is indicated by the mark. In H- -g- and -g- time the accent occurs 

only upon the first note in the measure. 





■ —±-m — O — # 1 



.#_.. 



II 




It will be observed in time indicated by the even numbers, that 
notes requiring bars across the stems are combined in groups of even 

numbers. And in J*f |£ and 3? they are tied together in groups of 

three. This is not always the case, but most generally so. 

When the unaccented part pf a measure is to receive a particular 
emphasis, it is shown by the characters /£ or rf, or=~ , or a. And 
when the weaker part of a measure is made of more importance than 
the strong, such deviation from the regular accent is called Syncopa- 
tion. 

Emphasis. 




Syncopation, 




^- 



?=3 



-**«l-r- 



Double Bars indicate the end of a strain, and the con- 
clusion of a tUne, thus : — 

Dots before or after a double bar, signify repetition. 

m 



m 




or 



m 



When the letters D. C. — which signifies Da Capo— are found over 
a double bar, it signifies that the first part of the piece must be play- 
ed again before proceeding to finish the piece." When it is found at 
the last strain, it implies that we must return and finish with the first 
strain : but, if we And this character, /-^ which is called a Pause, over 
any double bar, it signifies the end, or conclusion. The Pause is some- 
times for another purpose : that is, when placed over a rest or note, 
the performer must dwell upon it, or can introduce an embelishmeut. 
such as he may think proper, for effect. 

This mark is called a Sign.j£ When it appears the second time, 
it signifies that we are to return to where it is first found, and finish 
at the pause which occurs over the first double bar after it. 






First Part. 



Examples. 

mm 



B.C. 



m 



The end. 
Second Part. 




/^•s Third Part. Fine,/~\ 



wmtwm. 



12 



KUDIMENTS OF MUSIC, 



Here we play the first and second strains, when the D, C. directs 
us to play the first part again which makes the the third strain ; and 
then we skip the second part and proceed to the fourth strain, and 
finish at the pause . 



i 



First Part. 



X 



Second Part. 



m 



;n 



Sj 



Third Part. 



Fifth Part. 
Fourth Part. 



I 



X 

£ 



Sixth Part. 

After playing the first four parts, the «£ appearing the second time 
directs us to where it appeared at first, when we play on till we reach 
the £* 

The word Bis placed over one or more bars signifys repitition. It 
is sometimes accompanied with the dots for repetition, or detached 
lines to indicate the number of bars repeated, 

Example. 






Written. 






Played. 

8va »*•*** written over any number of notes implies that they 
are to be played eight notes, or an octave, higher, until the word Loco 
appears, which signifies as written. 




Played 



Abbreviations. 



When a successions of similar notes is required, we sometimes 
use the following characters, which are termed abbreviations. 

A whole note with a single dash signifies that it is to be played as 
eighth notes. 




Written. Played. 

A double dash, to be played thus : — 




TSL 



^MzM-*iM=MzMzMz*zi 



Written. 



Played. 




Written. Played. Written. Played. 

Other Examples op Abbreviations. 




Written 



Written. 



RUDIMENTS OF MUSIC. 



13 



i 



* 



:inr 



Written. 



Played. 




Written. Played. 

This character signifies repetition : 




Written. 



Played. 




3 



1~*- 



effios 



Written. 



Played. 



A Swell -~ b = == ^ and Diminuendo ^=— are often united, — =c=~ 
the first is executed by commencing the note gently, and gradually 
increasing the tone ; the second, by commencing with force and grad- 
ually diminishing; and when united, it is executed by touching the 
note over which it is placed, at first gently, and by degrees increasing 
the tone, till it arrives at its full pitch, then diminishing it till it -falls oif 
to its first softness, 

This character ** is called a Turn, and is executed in the following 
manner: — 




Written. Played. 



Written. 



Played. 



There are several kinds of turns : the plain turn «e, inverted turn 
|, turn after a dot, &c, which are fully explained in the following 
examples ; 

Plain torn. Inverted. Turn after a Dot. ->$ 

ess G ass aw % 



Written. 



Played. 



?=i==]^^!^n 




^giSoSSSpl 



A Shake \**) is one of the principal embellishment of music, 
if well performed, but should not be so frequently and injudiciously 
used as is often the case. A plain shake is the sound of two notes 
put in equal motion. A turned shake is composed of three diatonic 
notes, the first of which is called the preparative note, and the last 
two its resolution. Shakes, and all other kinds of Graces, must be 
played in proper time. 



14 



Plain Shake. 



RUDIMENTS OF MUSIC. 
u tr 



Written. 



Played. 



i 



AV 

■9— 







W 



9 m 9 . m -Y — HfF— I ' 1 j 1 1 1 1 



Passing Shake. 



Written. 



q ^j # ~ -; •— y= 



— .w ■ 



Played. 



\ 



f -^~ P ' * —• Wt?~9 






Written. 



Played. 



i 



*=* 



Turned Shake, 



m 



1 



Preparative. 



Resolution. 



H 1- 



*-•-*•-*-• *-» 






" iS>- 



isr. 



i 



Preparative. 

*=* — 



Resolution. 



■9- m —0 «- *-#- p-«-0- 



£— * 



a: 



r* p« — 



;i 



Appogiatura or Grace Note. 

The Appogiatura, or Grace note is a small note reversed and add- 
ed to other notes for sake of expression. Whatever length is given to 
the small note must be taken out of the time of the principal note im- 
mediately after it. There are two kinds of Appogiaturas, the greater 
and the lesser. 



Written. 



Played . 



I 






The Greater. 



The Lesser. 



* 






Other Examples. 



Written 



Played, 




mm 



ifeg jig^p 



EUDIMENTS OF MUSIC. 



15 



Written, 



Played. 



H j fy ■ I. | i -f •-» H 






^zxit-p 



I 



-<&- 



1 



-1~K- 



iT^ 






-fc*-fc£=£ 



^S^iiiiilg^ 



Notes are always connected in the most convenient form, for this 
reason we sometimes observe them in this manner : 




When the last two bars of a strain are marked lmo and 2mo, 
(that is, to be repeated,) it implies that when played the second time, 
the 2mo is to be substituted for the lmo, which is of course omitted. 



Written 




Played. 



Intervals. 

An Interval is the distance from any one tone or note to the fol- 
lowing one. The smallest interval is that of a second. The first and 
last note are included in counting the distance, 

A Second is the distance from any one note in the scale to the 
next following one. 



I 



¥ 



-&- 



•ztz 



or 



&- 



-<S2- 



zp: 



3*=*; 



or 



fed 



Intervals of a Second. 



Intervals of a Third. 



ep^ctS 



or 



-&- 



zzt 



Intervals of a Sixth. 

It must be observed that the interval of a third is composed of 
three notes, E, F, G, or A, B, Q, &,; the intervals of a sixth, of six notes 
E, F, G, A, B, C, or F, G, A, B, C, D, &c. 



16 



RUDIMENTS OF MUSIC. 



Some intervals are small, aud others large. In the regular Major 
Scale we find tones aud semitones in the following order : 



i 



2, 



3, - 4, 



5, 



6, 



7, -^3. 



ZJ&- 



-&- 



-<G>- 



Tone. Tone. Semitone. Tone. Tone. Tone. Semitone. 

A Semitone always between E and F, also between B and C, which 
are the third and fourth and the seventh and eighth notes of the scale 
this is called the Natural Key, (because it has no signature of flats or 
sharps,) or the key of C, because the tones and semitones are calcula- 
ted from the note C. 

Transposition of the Keys, or Scale. 

When C is taken as 1, the scale is said to be in its natural position; 
but either of the other letters may be taken as 1, in which case the 
scale is said to be Transposed. As 1 is the basis of the scale, the 
foundation on which it rests, so the letter which is taken for this sound 
is called the Key Note. Thus, if the scale be in its natural position, 
it is said to be in the key of C ,• if G be taken as 1, the scale is in the 
key of G; if D be taken as 1, the scale is in the key of D ; and so on 
with the rest of the seven letters ; whichever letter is taken as 1, that 
letter beeomes the key-note of the scale. 

In transposing the scale, the order of the intervals, or tones and 
semitones, must be preserved. Thus, the interval must always be a 
tone from 1 to 2, a tone from 2 to 3, a semitone from 3 to 4, a tone 
from 4 to 5, a tone from 5 to 6, a tone from 6 to 7, and a semitone from 
7 to 8. The interval from one letter to another is always the same, 
and cannot be changed, — thus, it is always a tone from C to D, and 
from D to E, a semitone from E to F, a tone from F to G, from G to A, 
from A to B, and a semitone from B to C, In the transposition of the 
scale, therefore, it becomes necessary to introduce sharps and flats, or 
to substitute sharped or flatted letters for the natural letters, so as to 
preserve the proper order of the intervals. 

First transposition by sharps from C to G, a fifth higher or a fourth 
lower. 




The same method is followed in all the transpositions by sharps, 
viz., the fifth above or fourth below is taken as 1 of a new key, in every 
succeeding transposition, and an additional sharp will be required also 
in every succeeding transposition. 

To transpose the scale by flats, we take the fourth (instead of the 
fifth) of every new scale. F is the fourth of C ; hence it is 1 of the 
new scale (key of F.) Tbe order of intervals must be the same in the 
flat keys as in the sharps ; hence the B must be made flat. 

The Sharp Keys. 

G MAJOR. 




p^l^i 



RUDIMENTS OF MUSIC. 



17 



&M 



m^ 



:*-«-*i:c: 



E MAJOR. 



0—+ 



•—* 



m 



S53 



mil 



3E*E? 



The Flat Keys. 

f MAJOR. 



o~* 



#=p 



rz 



W~i 



i i==t:- p: 






:^2Z3 



* 



B2 MAJOR. 



s^s 



© 



T + 1 — f—f —r 



-&- 



EJ2 MAJOR. 



:fiEEj 



-&- 



1-0 



-0 



=F- 



P2— 0- 



:q=z: 



«— * 



-s>- 



iHii 



i=W 



AJ2 MAJOR. 

-9—0-. 



It; 



r-TP=ir- 



*— # 



:sz 



The difference between the major and minor key is a minor third, 
(three semitones.) The major third contains two whole tones, (four 
semitones.) 



Example, 
major third. 



% 



-->-- 



Si- 



i=t 



m 



SCALE IN THE KEY OF C, MAJOR MODE, 



-19- 



~&- 



-G>- 



-E3T-0- 



<5>- 



-ZL/Z&L 



-<S>- 



72 



fS>- 



sr 



■&- 



sr 



3 



-&- 



The third in the minor scale contains one whole tone and a semitone. 

MINOR THIKD. 



i 



* 



1 



I 



w 



s>- 



-&-0- 



SCALE IN THE KEY OF A, MINOR MODE, 



-&-&■ 



-<5h 



is: 



-&- 



The relative minor of a major key has the same number of sharps 
or flats, and is found one minor third below the key note. 



Minor Scales. 

E MAJOR. 



F*» 






•»1 



?z=|» 



t±tz=|=4± 



0—j- 



aL 



■^- 



ai^fjL^ 



B MINOR. 



© 



— Ir-^ 



t=nz 



h«_::^. 



3 



18 



EUDIMENTS OF MUSIC. 



FJf MINOR. 

1 — &— *— g + r- r ~h ~F — — r 



*& 



*— ^ 



*z±£3 



C# MINOR. 



F*^ 



p^^i 



F^fefc 



n 



-*£1E« 



T^ 1 - 



D MINOR. 



n 



-&-*- 



a 



• — — 3i 1 — H 1 — i — f -■ — 9- 



jzzp±t=t:^P 



75- 



1 



B MINOR. 



§H 






-s*- 



I 



C MINOR. 



■*—*- 



J=W 



i?=-^»:^^.^£g& 



#— ^ 



:» 



-#— ^ 



1 



F MINOR. 



£ 



s=± 



^=]p=Fz±± ' ' — |-- t - [ — i — zzzgihazJ 



Chromatic Scale. 

This scale contains all the notes, natural, flat and sharp, to D above 
the second leger line. 



i 



i h 



H h- 



£? or ^^- !♦ j^ort?"» h If" 



♦ ftF7«* 



i 



v-*. 



or-P* •- 



^=^~~ J ~ ^ = ^ === ^ 



1 



p f J |l -| ^ k d= fa fa # _ ^:orI ^ g_ | 



I LL 



♦> t>#. ij*. k g* ft ; 



-i h 



J 



Chords. 

Chords, or double notes, are written one above the other, and can 
be played upon the Banjo, Guitar, Violin, Piano, Melodeon, &c, in music 
for, the Flute, Clarionet, Fife, &c, the upper note only must be played. 




A Dictionary of Musical Terms. 



19 



A; an Italian preposition, meaning to, in, by, at, &c. 
Accelerando ; accelerating the time, gradually faster and 

faster. 
Adagio, or Adasio ; slow. 
Adagio Assai or Molto; very slow; 
Ad Libitum ; at pleasure. 
Affetuoso; tender and affecting. 
Agitato; with agitation. 
AllaCapella; in church style; 

Allegretto; less quick than Allegro. Allegro ; quick. 
Allegro Assai ; very quick. 

Allegro ma non thoppo; quick, but not too quick; 
Amvbile; in a gentle and tender style. 
Amateur; a lover hut not a professor of mnsic. 
Amoroso, or Con Amore; affectionately, tenderly. 
Andante; gentle, distinct, and rather slow, yet connected. 
Andantino ; somewhat slower than Andante. 
Animato, or Con Anima ; with fervent, animated expression. 
Animo, or Con Animo; with spirit, courage and boldness. 
Antipiione ; music sung in alternate parts. 
Arioso; in a light, airy, singing manner. 
A Tempo; in time. 

A Tempo Giusto; in strict and exact time. 
Ben Marcato; in a pointed and well-marked manner. 
Bis; twice. 

Brillante ; brillant, gay, shining, sparkling. 
Cadence; closing strain: also, a fanciful extemporaneous 

embelishmcnt at the close of a song. 
Cadenza ; same as the second use of Cadence. See Cadence. 
Calando ; softer and slower. 
Cantabilb, graceful singing style; a pleasing, flowing, 

melody. 
Canto ; the treble part in a chorus. 
Choir; a company or band of singers; also, that part of a 

church appropriated to the singers. 
Chorist, or Chorister; a member of a choir of singers. 
Col, or Con; with. ColArco; with the bow. 
Comodo, or Com Mono; in an easy and unrestrained manner. 
Con Affetto; with expression. 
Con Dolcessaj with delicacy. 

Con Dolore, or Con Dtolo; with mournful expression. 
Conductor; one who superintends a musical performance; 

same as Music Director. 
Con Enkrgia; with energv. 
Con Expressione ; with expression. 
Con Fuoco; with ardor, fire. 
Con Grazia ; with grace and elegance. 
Con Impeto; with force, energy. 
Con Justo ; with chaste exactness. 
Con Moto; with emotion. 
Con Spirito; with spirit, animation. 
Coro; chorus; 
Da ; for, from, of. 



Duett; for two voices or instruments. 

Diminuendo; gradually diminishing the sound. 

Da Capo; from the beginning. 

Declamando; in the style of declamation. 

Decrf.scendo ; diminishing, decreasing. 

Devoztone; devotional. 

Dilettante ; a lover of the arts in general, ora lover of music. 

Di Molto ; much or very. 

Divoto; devotedly, devoutly. 

Dolce; soft, sweet, tender, delicate. 

Dolente, or Dolorosa ; mournful. 

Doloroso; in a plaintive, mournful style. 

E; and. Elegante; elegance. 

Energico, or Con Energia; with energy. 

Espressivo ; expressive. 

Fine, Fin or Finale ; the end. 

Forzando, Forza or Fz ; sudden Increase of power. 

Fugue or Fuga; a composition which repeats or sustains, 

in its several parts, throughout, the subject with which 

it commences, and which is often led off by some one 

of its parts. 
Fuoato ; in the fugue style. 
Fughetto; a short fugue. 
Giusto ; in exact and steady time. 
Grazioso; smoothly, gracefully. 
Grave; slow and solemn. 
Impresario; the conductor of a concert. 
Lacrimando, or Lacrimoso; mournful and pathetic. 
Lamentevole, Lamentando, Lamentabile ; mournfully. 
Larghtssimo ; extremely slow. 
Larghetto ; slow, but not so slow as Largo. 
Largo; slow. 

Legato ; close, gliding, connected style. 
Lentando ; gradually slower and softer. 
Lento or Lentamente ; slow. 
Ma ; but. 

Maestoso,- majestic, majestically. 
Maestro di Capella; chapel-master, or conductor of 

church music. 
Marcato ; in a strong and marked style. 
Messa di Voce ; moderate swell. 
Moderato, or Moderamente ; moderately, in moderate 

time. 
Molto; much or very. 
Molto Voce ; with a full voice. 
Morendo; gradually dying away. 
Mordente ; a beat or transient shake. 
Mosso ; emotion. 
Moto ; motion. Andante Con Moto ; quicker than 

Andante. 
Non; not, as; Non Troppo; not too much. 



Organo ; the organ. 

Orchestra ; a company or band of instrumental performers. 

Pastoral ; applied to graceful movements in sextuple time. 

Piu ; more. Piu Mosso ; with more motion, faster. 

Pizzicato; snapping the violin string with the fingers. 

Poco ; a little. Poco Adagio ; a little slow. 

Poco a Poco ; by degrees, gradually. 

Portamento ; the manner of sustaining and conducting; 

the voice from one sound to another. 
Precentor ; conductor, leader of a choir. 
Presto; quick. 
Prestissimo ; very quick. 
Rallentando, Allentando, or Slentando : slower and: 

softer by degrees. 
Recitando ; a speaking manner of performance. 
Recitante : in a style of recitative. 
Recitative ; musical declamation. 
Rinforzando, Einf, or Rinforzo; suddenly increasing - 

in power. 
Ritardando ; slackening the time. 
Semplice ; chaste, simple. 
Sempre; throughout, always; as, Sempbe Forte; loud; 

throughout. 
Senza: without, as, Senza Organo; without the Organ. 
Sforzando, or Sforzato ; with strong force or emphasis;. 

rapidly diminishing. 
Sicilian; a movement of lijht, graceful character. 
Smorendo, Smorzando; dying away. 
Soave, Soavemente ; sweet, sweetly. See Dolce. . 
Solff.ggio ; a vocal exercise. 
Solo; for a single voice, or instrument. 
Sostencto ; sustained. 

Sotto; under, below. Sotto Voce; with subdued voice. . 
Spiritoso, Con Spirito; with spirit and animation. 
Staccato ; short, detached, distinct. 
Subito; quick. 

Tace, or Tacet ; silent, or to be silent. Tardo ; slow. 

Tasto Solo ; without chords. 

Tempo; time. Tempo a Piacere; time at pleasure. 

Tempo Giusto: in exact time. 

Ten, Tenuto; hold on. See Sostennto. 

TtJTTi ; the whole, full chorus. 

Un; a; as, Un Poco; a little. 

Va; goon; as Va Crescendo; continue to increase. 

Verse; same as Solo. Vigoroso; bold, energetic. 

Vivace; quick and cheerful. 

Virtuoso; a proficient in art. Voce Sola; voice alone.. 

Volti Subito; turn over quickly. 



20 




Selecting and Adjusting the Proper Strings, 

Select a very fine E string, which is called, four lengths for 
the Violin, cut the same in two equal parts, and use one for the 
first and the other for the fifth string. Select for the second string, 
;an E string, also, a grade heavier. Select for the third string, an 
A string for the Violin, of medium size. The fourth string is the 
Bass, which should be a fine silver string, wound on white silk, 
rwhich are wound of late, expressly for the Banjo, while formerly 
a Guitar D string was used in its stead, which is not so good for 
the Banjo, in tone or durability. On inserting the strings in the 
tail piece, fasten the knot on the upper side of the same, which 
lifts it from the head, and in winding the string around the peg, 
always let the coil lie close to the surface of the handle, thereby 
holding the peg in place, while, if the string be wound on the 
upper portion of the peg, it continually slips and gets out of tune. 

The Tones, as Eepresented on the State, Produced on 
The Five Open Strings. 



i 



B 



iii» 



Pi 



E -* 



E 



-<s>- 



-& — 



-&- 



" 



It will be seen by the above diagram, that when the Banjo is 
properly tuned, the first string, open, is B. J 

the second string, open, is ttG. 7 7~\ 

the third string, open, is E. 

the fourth string, open, is A. 

the fifth string, open, is E. 

Now take four of these notes, as per example, and we produce 
the chord of E Major, the chord most readily performed on the 
Banjo, especially by a beginner, as they are all on open strings. 

Arpeggio Chord. 



«— - 




I 



h 



m 



E jfG B E 
Having performed the above chord in arpeggio style, (arpeggio 
is to play one note after the other, commencing with the lowest, 
in quick succession, the sign for which is a curved line,) we place 
down two fingers of the left hand, as follows : The first finger 
at the first fret of the second string ; the second finger on 
second fret of the first string, and we produce the 
chord of A Major. 



the 
following 



New School for the Banjo. 



i 



W 



1 

-qz: 



Sp 



It will be observed that there is an additional sharp to the one 
occurring on the second string open, that one which occurs on the 
first string, at the second fret, Ott, will be explained farther on. 

How to Tune the Banjo to Produce the Tones as Shown 
in the Diagram on Preceeding Page. 

Tune the fourth string to A, from a pitch pipe, then place the sec- 
ond finger on the seventh fret of the fourth string, which tone pro- 
duced will be E, then tunc the third in unison with it, place the sec- 
ond finger en the fourth fret, of the third string, which gives jtG, 
and tune the second in unison with it ; then place the second 
finger on the third fret, of the second string, which gives B, and 
tune the first in unison with it, then place the second finger on the 
fifth fret, of the first string, which gives E, and tune the fifth in 
unison with it ; then play the following exercise on the two chords 
already explained to familiarize the sounds. 



Exercise after Tuning 






og.#-o- 



£ 






How to Hold the Banjo. 

The rim of the Banjo should rest on the centre of the right 
thigh, and kept in that place by the right breast resting on the 
upper portion of it. Best the left foot flat on the floor, and ele- 
vate the right foot on the ball, rest the neck (or handle) of the 
Banjo in the hollow of the left hand, the first and second fingers 
directly over the second and first string. (See cut,) 




21 



The wrist of the right hand should rest directly over the tail 
piece, bringing the right hand just in front of the bridge, resting 
the 3d or 4th finger on the parchment, (or head) to steady the 
hand while picking. 

Signs for Eight Hand Fingering, in Picking, or Guitar Style. 

For the first finger, one dot, thus, . ; for the second finger, two dots 
thus, . . ; for the third finger, three dots, thus, . . . See cut show- 
ing the position of the right hand, in picking or guitar style. 




LEFT HAND FINGEK1NO. 

One figure above or below the staff, indicates the finger em- 
ployed, also, the fret at Avhich the string is stopped. When there- 
are two figures added to a note, the upper one indicates the fret,, 
while the lower one indicates the finger that stops the string. 
The zero, thus, o, indicates an open string. 



22 



George C. Dobson's 



Exercises. 

Eight and Left Hand Fingering. 



NO. i. 

12 



^•M'^ 'j l \Ww \ 2 *43* o ooo o ooo oio 



PHSjSPS! 






T9TZ9 



A-.A-AA 



Jc e 



_.. -14—.--'. 



~4 






-rS>- 



No. 

flft.. 



2. o o o o 

00^ 00^ 12^ 12^ 

o^ffi o^*n o^ri o^**ri 
r -j — |_ifl — i » — _« — 



Sd p«s. Barre So, 1. 

2 2 4 2 2 4 1 ^ 

"3 



±|3i= 



!#=-- - 



i.^. 



Stroke Plating. 
Partly close the hand, bringing the forefinger near the palm, 
then each of the following fingers a little farther from the palm, 
bringing the forefinger an inch and a half from the inside of the 
thumb. Notes to be made by the thumb will have a cross, 
thus : x. Notes to be made by the back of the uail of the fore- 
finger, will have the letter N. 

Example. 

3 _ X. 3 X 




See following cut for position of the right arm from the shoul- 
der, also of the right hand iu playing the stroke. 




The Rule fob Fretting the Banjo. 

As many Banjos vary in size, it would be useless to make a 
diagram (to insert in this book) to fret them all by, therefore, 
whatever length the handle of your Banjo is, the following rule 
will enable you to fret it correctly : Place the bridge on the 
parchment, about three inches from the edge of the hoop, (the 
edge where the tail piece rests,) and mark the same with a pencil, 
then divide the distance from the nut (the small piece of wood 
over which the strings pass to the pegs) to the bridge into 18 equal 
parts, and mark for the first fret, then divide from the first fret 
to the bridge into 18 equal parts, and mark for the second fret, 
and so on until you get 16 frets. The frets should be of fancy 
wood, about an 8th or a 16th of an inch in width, inlaid level with 
the surface of the fingerboard. The first, third, sixth, ninth, and 
thirteenth frets, should be inlaid half the width of the fingerboard. 



New School for the Banjo. 



23 



The second, fourth, fifth, seventh, eighth, twelfth, and sixteenth, 
should be inlaid the full width of the fingerboard, while the re&t of 
them should taper Irani two-thirds a little less than each other, 
as shown in the following cut. 

ILLUSTRATING THE ABOVE MANNER OF FRETTING THE BANJO. 




liy this manner of fretting, the positions on the Banjo can be 
readily committed to memory, and greater facility in performing 
can be attained in less time, than where the frets extend the en- 
tire Width of the fingerboard. 

How to Put a Head on a Banjo. 

Select a good lime cured, calf skin head, one that is not too 
thick, or too thin. It should be even in all parts, be sure to not 
get one that is made transparent by a preparation , as they are with- 
out tone or durability. Where a portion of a head is clear, 
(transparent) and a portion is white, they are the best, as there 
has been no artificial means employed to make it clear. Wet 
the head for about five minutes, until the rattling stiffness dis- 
appears, then place it over the top of the hoop, place on the Avire 
hoop, then the brass hoop, upon which the hooks are used to 
stretch the same, if the head is too small to pull it through with 
the fingers, use a small pair of plyers, and get all the wrinkles out 
around the wire hoop, before pressing the upper hoop down, then 
put on the screws, about four, in equal distances around the hoop : 
these four hooks will hold the rim in its place, while you 
once more go around the hoop of the Banjo, and see that the 
edge of the head is well drawn through, having every wrinkle 



drawn out. Then put on the remainder of the hooks, and with 
your wrench, draw down the head, until it is within an 8th of au 
inch from the edge of the wooden hoop, then take and trim the 
surplus head, with the sharp edge of a small knife ; let it rest, 
while trimming the head, on the brass hoop, taking care not to 
let the knife slip, and cut any other portion, but the part, you are 
cutting off. Let the brass hoop remain up the 8th of an inch, 
until the head becomes thoroughly dry, and then tighten it a lit- 
tle, from time to time, (every few days), and by the time the brass 
hoop is drawn level with the wooden hoop, it will have become 
thoroughly dry, and seasoned, and will not be apt to stretch 
much more. All Banjo heads, no matter how tight they are, 
are more or less effected in damp weather, and at such a time, they 
should not be meddled with, as the head will resume that tough- 
ness and tightness, as the atmosphere changes ; but in a case 
where the performer wishes to use the instrument, specially, the- 
head may be tightened at any time. The best Banjo may be 
spoiled, as far as tone is concerned, in putting on the head, while 
an infeiTor Banjo may be greatly improved, when the head is 
properly put on. 

How to Clean a Soiled Banjo Head Without Removing it. 

Wet a sponge, or cloth, in a little soap water, and rub lightly- 
over the part soiled, which will remove all the dirt, at once, then 
rub it off withamoist cloth, of clean water, finishing with a drycloth. 
The dampness you have subjected the head to through this pro'cess, 
will soon dry off, leaving the head looking as cleau and good as new.. 

The Care or the Instrument. 

The Banjo should not be kept in a hot, or damp room, as ex- 
cessive heat would be apt to warp the wood work, while the head 
would absorb the dampness. The bridge may be left up, in its 
place, if the instrument is frequently used, otherwise, taken, 
down. The Banjo is an instrument Avhich requires great care 
and nursing, to give, at all times, satisfaction to the performer 
and his auditors. When not in use, it should be kept in a green, 
baize bag, or a box, lined with the same. 



24 



George C. Dobson's 



The Proper Dimensions for Constructing a Banjo. 

The width of hoop should be eleven inches ; the depth, two and 
five-eighths inches. The length of the handle, from the nut to the 
front edge of the hoop, seventeen and one-half inches. The 5th 
peg should come directly opposite the 5th fret. The handle should 
be black walnut, veneered with rosewood, or ebony, on the surface. 
The hoop may be ash, maple, or oak, (a good, heavy rim should be 
selected.) The number of hooks and brackets generally used in 
tightening the head, are 16 ; 24, however, adds to the appearence 
of the instrument, and subjects each hook to less strain, whereby, 
the threads are less liable to give out, and a still better tone may 
be produced, as the tighter the head the better the tone, of a pro- 
perly constructed Banjo. The above dimensions for the length 
of the handle, (with all inch hoop) bring all the chords in a nat- 
ural order of fingering, that is, the frets are just a proper distance 
from each other. Where the handle is longer, the fingering is 
more difficult, as the frets are wider apart. A bridge made of soft 
wood, pine, or cedar, is best for tone, a hard wood bridge deaden- 
ing the tone. 

Tiie Natural Key of the Banjo, (A Major,) Explained. 

The natural key in music is C Major, having for its signature 
the G clef. zSp. The natural key, however, for the Banjo isthe key 

■ of A Major, /W which has, in addition to the G clef, (and placed 
next to the X7^ same,) three sharps, thus : *JkJJL_ placed on the 

■ degrees, F, C, and G, and are equal to a yM% — sharp occur- 
ing before each individual tone, during the Vj7 progress of 
the scale, a piece,or an exercise. 

Why is the key of A Major, with three sharps, the natural key 
of the Banjo ? Because the size of the strings adopted, is suited 
to the bulk and structure of the instrument, and when tuned with 
the male voice, the strings are less liable to break, than if tuned 
to a higher pitch ; and the tone is more brilliant and satisfac- 
tory, than if tuned lower. The Banjo, like all other instru- 
ments, has its favorite kc}'s, and those keys most suitable for 
beginners are A and E Major, and JF Minor, and for those ad- 



vanced, the following keys are often performed in : B Major, D 
Major, G Major, C Major, F Major, &C Minor, B Minor, D Minor, 
A Minor, E Minor, &c. All of these keys may be performed in 
without tuning the Banjo, any different from the instructions 
already given. 

The Scale of A Major, in Sections. 

The first four notes of the scale are all made on the fourth 
string, and are represented below the staff. These four notes 
must be committed to memory, (before going to the next string,) 
the literal name, also, at what fret each note is made on the finger- 
board, also, the position of the note on the staff, and the fingers of 
the left hand that stops it, must be committed at one and the 
same time, practically and theoretically. 



i 



4th String. 



-3-2%*-* 



3d String. 

*£4 



BjfC 
2d String. 



D 



1 Hfp 




1st String. 
B £C D 




5th String. 

it- °— 



1st String. 

9 v 10 

7 n.3 4 



E 




mm^t 



p? #G A 



I 



New School for the Banjo. 25 

Having learned the notes and at what fret each note is produced, the sharps will be no longer placed before each note as it Laay occur, 
but next to the clef only, which is equal to the same, and whatever line or space a sharp may be placed upon next the clef, all notes that 
occur on that degree are played sharp throughout the peice, unless contradicted by a natural. 

The Major Scale ill A. (Written in two Octaves.) Chords. 




m 



m 



:q: 



» Exercise. 



-4 *- 



^0- 



£ 



-40- 



-0#- 



-00- 



fe^EE 



=t=^=s 



*=*=* 



I! 




Amusement. 



^"^ 



f™^ 



?SEE 



^=«=* 




Simple Accompaniment Chords, 

J 1 1 — 4^4- ' ' 



L tr 1 — 00 — ■*« 2' — 1 00 1— . . » i — 1 — 00 — 3 « — o#- x — 0-0 - 11 - * 



2"*" 0^ 




2*" 



■#— i o# 1 Li- — i-# 0-LJ0. m * ±-0 l — \-t -•-■ 



26 Jig Exercise. 



George C. Dobson's 




M 






£=¥ 



:JES 



"r— i 



q=at 



~ H 



T— J- 



*xzt== 



IB 



Lizzie Polka. 



pEg BiS^ 




-O- 






-■•— h- 







T -^->- 



•-~^-"-^i§| 



-m- 



C : BZ — I., « 1_0 I H #-!« : * J-h « Eji L H JJ 



Beanery Walk Around, 



* 



r M=-v 



z4b^ 



-*==p: 



-i — 



n n n ^ 



■=3=: :=*_=t=EiJ=i: :^!=rf; :=izLzi =?=fc: :z£S:=£=£ 



«£ 



FINE. 



— #-# 



i 



DANCE. 



X--1-- rat— I— 



D.C. 



! tt-1:-^-bi-"-F — »-F- -£• — "-^o- 1 - J*— =*=-- -=)~i — ^- =^-=p#:--- -J-*-- 81 *-* — 3-# — ^ — n^ • iv -H- 



u j# My Loves' a Lassie 



FINE. 



$ 



£e=g 



rz=::«r 



Stroke. 



3=5=5- 



=P=P 



=t 



S 



:i: 



*-0 



-+ ■+ 



" I -i-F-|-»-E-» ^P-^" i l " ^-" -*** |ta '* ' ^ -}-a i~H 



J*- 



-_ £p** 



Z>.<7. 






New School for the Banjo. 
3 r"3 3 



Dutehmans Jig. 

^ u Stroke. 3 

r^g%zz=— «— zzzr^zz-zzzzz :pzizzz_# — rj^^^qzazzHzp— zp*zrz*— zr *z 



— i — i — —i 



27 


r^n — -* -J — T -- A * 1 



^«^=F=I=~ 



; j _•*,_; L*, 3 

5z fezEazztz*::: :z?zZ2zzjzz5z: :zp3ztzSzizrzz^z&z±z*^iz -*=*:: :: 

Fannie's Waltz. 



■#— a — i — «*-:- 



^z'zzzfzj: 



IB 



:fezfcfz zfcizgfc £z: izjzzzjfczffzz z jzgzjzj zfz izzt-zzizzzzzfe: rga tfafcEi ^zfezzzzp gzz bgzzEp z z z— -JT=* E j 

LXDZ it — , X_« «_| — X_« X — | ^«_X — , X — |_S «_X — ,_* # 1 — i u 

•/-,-* — (• — f — r J -— - — (■ 



rt=fe»: 



?n- T -n 



*— ~ r-g ^ * T g ~« * 1 — 1 -t-^ — * "-t -g 1< t~j-»- * 1 — | " H 



Fairy Waltz. •;■__ 
dESsfEbaz: :zzlz#izziztz: zjEjzt Jzzzzzz :zz|z jzfzjzzzfz: zzjzMzzzVtz: izzV^-^-rzHz^zj 1 zzzzzlzzlzdJ 

' it — , X — | L_ # X_ a 1 — | L — | L # L — | IJ 



--J-f-4-r-i 



:Uz 



-*flzzz:zr* 



a^-^^ zzzzzjz ^z^z^zzzzz jzazzjz^z^z^zgzzzijzzz 
tztzszrz: :r^z=sz=tz&=i==: » * zjz: :z J 

^ — H ^ — X — i X_ # L a_X_«_ 



% 



Yankee Doodle. 



jzazzra: 



iflzqziziz—dzizTS: 

— * — - = F« — j — 



n 



pzQz^gizz^lzz^zzzrzz 
laze — ft_ # -i— i 



z^zzzzzz?zz3z::zfzz^zz*zzzz:z«z^izizz3zf8z^ 

! X , 1 — | #-X_ 




F#ifc^*=«=F^ 



*=£-*=*- 



..-I— 



— 2 . 



zizzzi: 



" a* 



_J-_X 



:z«zzzh=: 

-3— 3— *-*? 



*-*: 



^Z±—W7. 



ZZZZE 



:*zz:*: 



=zfe 
•zziz: 



II 



28 George C. Dobson's 

Wake Up Jig. — — 

I 1_| L H 1 ±0 1 H 1 L_| <-0 



^3: 



P55 



l igyfcKEEJH 




g£Sjj;^ zJ55: 



J. -I 1- 



-0 0- 



2*-+* 



■ M~.M < * 



1? 



•# ■+ ■+ 



SI 



Up in de Mountains. 



'gg^:zz^zi=q^=— — bzt_ # m 



-i- 



0-*—l 



z^zpz-zzp 



»-'— P^jh 



— ,-— ■!- 



— — h — g — ,- m 9 



_*_* 



rzfizOzzq 



*— i- 



y=y-^H^ 



■ 



i 



-# — # 



:pzzz&: 



fzrfzat 



zzjzqrzT!zzzzz:zzzfzizzzzzzz_* — ^=[-4— 1 — ^^^ 



# 






-• — #- 



r^zzp: 



H # »- 



-P- V 



-0 0- 



-*—*- 



4=q=^-*^-Lr 



:?as 



t=n=t 



tf 



fc= *=»=*= ? 



=#-r-^ 



p|3=g=g=^ 



:iz=f: 



gggjgjl 



Yango Jig. 






^S^ 



izotzzzzt 



"1 — I "fe=H — H — 



zjzzjbzjzzgl 



3zz2z 



0-+T+ 



-s # 



Yango Jig. Concluded. 



New School for the Banjo. 



* 









gzzfZ^gzi ZZZZ: ffEjz^=j-!Ei^Zz|=3=i *^* 



.^25 



=t 



29 

zztzzpzzzzfa 
:*zztzjzz*z: 



* 



--X 



4=3- 



-* — i — *- 

- -j — < ^-s — 



t=P 



I -, j -i 

H J- 1 1 1- 



#-*4-s-#— 



H 



■I I -1 



F*y 



5fc 



U=*zq: 



-*— 






I 1 z-i — • 1 I 1 

- — I — a — ^ — I — •+, — I- 



I ^ I 1 

H J-5 1 1 1— r' 






i ^ i -i 



:izztzi: 

# » 



=t=3=t 



±» — «— 



s* 



I 



g 



■i i ^ 

rizzizz*: 

— «j — # -s_ 



rir^ 






t=* 



■1 l ^ 

ijzztzi: 



■i i H i H r "^ 



z— ^rjzz fcp^: 

i=3=tj3zzz:z3 



iy 



Slur Waltz. 



1**1-T 






izzj: 



J=Et;E=E: 



3»* 



-<— I — «-- 1- 






-J U 



FIXE. 






F**fe 



4^- 



:zcpz=ir 



fczfz#zt?zjz t3=Jz=Sz: ~=«?zzi?: izjzEgzzzgz: izczj^zzzfz: iz jzzzgzzzg :: :z—z*zz«»; -zt^zttzztzz: 



30 



George C. Dobson's 



Get out of the Wilderness. 



■0-\-\ 1 i S— m- 



m 



^-s-r- 



_* m... 



— ■_*- 



4 — #-- --- 



*ife± 






3g=j: 



« i -f-i 



1 ■ ■ — - 1 # 



-* '- 






J — — i — 

-rrwa-m-mmmM. 



T~ * 



=T- 



s=« 






,m p. 



m 



.m «_ 



-#— !-iV 



ai 



The Major Scale in E. (Four Sharps.) 



Play every D one fret higher than in the previous scale of A Major ; all the rest are made as before. 

6 
4 4 4 

=t±z. ■ 



Chords. 



:X 



i—* — +■ 



-0 *- 



0- 



1 1 1 



i— *— ♦ 



i 



Exercise. 



1 ! — 00— " 



BE 



1—0"- 



zt=±=x 



- d 0- 



*—•—* 



-ST- 



m 



Amusement Jig. 



. ii 4+ 0400 ^ ■■■q 






(SSI: 

2 tfl o-J- 



*-0- 9 *-0- j 



4 



ii^Fr^ 



#-«- — i — I- J- 

— ^ 2 ffl 



-15^.- 



~j M r - g -*-* ~M— Ti l 



^-^=ir* 







New School for the Banjo. 



31 



Simple Accompaniment and Chords. 

tinz_ g rf 1 — >— J— "1-2-* — g > J-« — (-• 



* The 2d finger stopping B and F at the same time by bending the first joint towards the finger-board. 

2d po». Bgrre. 






Jf. 









i* 



p)9z*z±H^3pd:J:i^S=gi 



v lz J ^ ■* G ■ i -■-■■■■- -J ■■■■■■■■-" ■ ■ — *-— — I i i 



— h 



H 1 h 



BSE. 



1 — , — 




Blue Bells of Scotland. 



E fjfe 



4 



«»- 



-»€ 



9 ?J— 0# 

( lr«---0# 



•— #- 



■1-: 






«•- 






T 



- yfe-it-g= g 



#— * 



gEE«=u^ :: =£ 



rjipa: 



— i— i — i— 
-r-f-jg 



r 



gin 



*&=* 



, if I 2d po». Barre. I J | . I /T\ 



32 



George C. Dobson's 



The Barre. 

"When the forefinger is placed lengthwise across the finger hoard, 
stopping all the strings at one and the same time, it is called the Barre. 
We sometimes are required to stop two strings with one finger, this is 
also a Barre. Let us designate each by calling the first Barre No. 1, 
and the latter Barre No. 2. 



Example Illustrating the Barres. 



Barre No. 1. 

7lh now. 



I o<-#- 



Barre No, l.l Barre No.l.J 
5th po». | 2nd pos 



Open 
Strings. 



[Barre No. 2.' Barre No. 8. 
I 1st pot, I 1st pos. 




Position of Left Hand making Barre No. 1 at 7th Position. 




Exercise in Barre Chords. 

Set of A Major. 



7th Pos. Burre. j 8tli Pos. 




.ttg_._ | _25_«_«l — $J— 1— *4 - 



2nd Pos. Barre. I Loco, 
J Open. 

-I-U 



-40-0-0- 

-30-0-0- 



:z\zimzmim: 



0-\ — | -■ ■ 



r 
-#• 

In making the Barre No. 1 at the first, second, third and fourth 
position, use the third and fourth finger. 

Example, 2d Pos. Barre No. 1. - jfly-ff '^~ ?t"f — 1 1 




Baire No. 1. 
5th Pos. 



Barre No. 1 . 
7th Pos. 



m 






*•- 



Not a Barre. 
8th Pos. 
3-0- -0- 



m 



0-0- 0- 

Ket of E Major. 

7th Pos. Barre. ) 5th Pos. Barre. ( 7th Pos. Barre 



m 



|fea*§ : 



-t0 



-*•-#-•- 

£ 



"flER 



rr 



-^0-0-0 

-\0-0-0 









The same Chord Illustrated in the following Cut. 




New School for the Banjo. 



33 



For those Barre Chords occurring at or above the fifth fret, use the 
second and third finger in place of the third and fourth finger, as the 
frets are nearer together. The fourth finger is reserved for further use. 

Example. 
Barre Chord at the fifth and seventh positions. 



Barre No. 1. 



Barre No, 1. 



Barre No. 1, 




Not a Barre. 
i 
<3- 



fir* 



m 



-<*#- 



< ■ 

<o- 



I 



Barres showing further use for fourth finger. 
Example. 




Barre No. 1, 5th Pos., 
holding the Barre while 
adding the fourth finger 
to make A. 



Barre .No. 1, 7th Pos., | 
holding the Barre while 
adding the fourth finger 
to make B. i 



< — f 

Not a Barre. 
8th Pos. 



-&• 



Exercise Introducing Barre No. 2, 




Harmonies. 

The principal harmonics are found at the fourth, filth, seventh, 
twelfth, twentieth and twenty-fourth frets. Also at the eighteenth 
fret on the fifth string. 

In making harmonics, use the same right hand fingering as illus- 
trated in guitar style, while the fingering of the left hand is as follows : 

Press the fore-finger lightly on the string, sufficiently to prevent 
its vibration, as if open. 

Touch the strings delicately with the right hand : all the notes on 
the banjo may be played harmonically ; that is, a harmonic tone may 
be produced \\> any fret; but, like the Guitar, there are just so many 
which sound the best. These are the ones which give the most clear 
and distinct tone, which have been mentioned, and will be made use 
of in this work. 

Cut showing the delicate manner of touching the strings with the 
third" finger of the left hand in producing harmonics. 




Tho followiug "Bans Polka" is an excellent piece for practising 
the Barres and introducing Harmonic tones. 



George C. Dobson's 







tt* 



o» 1 1 1 1 

-• « — — — ' 



Barre Ho. 1. 7th. po». 




Barre No. 1, 
-#- 5th Pos. 



New School for the Banjo 
loco. 



Barre Polka. 


Concluded. 








3tb po». 

. U « 1 3 ^^ 1 


i 


- o 1 


ffife r ~H 


■ 1 J 


: m 

— i — 


— P 


t • -■ 




The Major Scale in D. 






:q=5 



2 4 1 - J 

" m • m #- 

— # ff 1 h - 



4 



-«— #- 



13 2 4 



Chords. 
D major. 



*— #- 



- 1 — r 



•— #- 



B minor. 



^^^a^^M 



The Major Scale in G. 



=33=4 



-*_ *- 



#— ^ 



-i-#-i- 



^— • 



■#— » 



4 



#— * 



'•*>■*■•+•* 



*~ •- 



G major. 



, 4- 



4-#- 

E minor. 



The Major Scale in C. 



1 



3 



--— 



33=~£ 



^=^= 



; • .__!_ 



*—• 



es 



13 1 



fe •— i 



w 



^— ^ 



1 i ] 'Li 1 
C major. A minor. 

^=pE|^EEiSEffjjnfs=si=fli 



4 2= 



The Major Scale in F, 

13 12 13 



F major. 

B. 2- 1 P- 



D minor. 



$==-- 



-*— #- 



I _| l__J UjWs^jfaH "J-n- 



The Major Scale in B!>. 
:fcT 



BJ? major. 




o-#- 
G minor. 



IfigHsii^il^fll 



!■#■ 



36 George C. Dobson's 

George C. Dobson's Original and Improved Diagram, showing the structure of the Finger-board. 



B, 1st String. 




Gf i 2nd String. 



;E, 3rd String. 



A; 4th String 



E> 5th String. 



(daMf* 



May Polka. 



- _2L 

— -ft-4-a; 



^izzi: 



^=H: 



razz:*: 



New School for the Banjo. 

zbzzzzizzzbzzzzz 



37 



3zz* 



<— t- 

<■*■ 



afczzzzj; 



.^U — a 

-I aJ J 



M=M- r 



<r-0- 



n 



*■ 



/"/##. s 



:*zzz«: 



zzczi 



-<-#- 



•zzzzz; 



— i — —i Tr 



atafc 



±—v 



-• — ^ 




:| 



Early Spring Polka. 



-< — — i — a- 



ifE3ES=E 



31 — a a — A — 0~- 



h h — i — T 



H « 1— 0- 



-■— I #— J 



zlzzzzzS 



h 



» f » - 



FINE. 



- Av -ff — * — I — g — *- 
^x? — 



:«S=z 



-€ — e 



c=r=nzjt5? 



-*?— 



{■=•— •— j- ^g 



-• — ■— * — *- 



r— P— # 0—*—0 

qzzgzz t=Q=£J= 



i — »- 



,#--r 



UzTzzzf zz?z: — z-zz-Zzizzziz: tzJ!i=d- a -^- a -j="=^ 



-a— a- 



-1->^ g - z - J 



M 



*- -^ ~+- »- " :X - -*— * • 1 ~ I » J- 1 



D.G. 



zzp «_zz-zzp*:zz-_ ± -,- - ^-a-^ 

— I 1 a 1 — ■ « ■ 



gzl 



38 



George C. Dobson's 



Budd Polka. 



*-' _*. • _+ -— - —+. — *• • —¥ -J. _h 




•-*-. 



■=# 



—I- 



— I- 
1 




* "— m 







1- 



*=F* 




=i 



3Z 



CODA. 



-1 




Barre lO. Barre Jfe, 8, 

l*o». No. 1. . 8th Po». Barre 5th Foa. 






P»». No. 1. 8th Poi, Barre 5th Poa, f™"™! f^"^^ P" - ""! 8t« Poai 

x__| -1J — ^ — — - l -* * 1 * — J-X — -j -I r o# 00 ' — i^V- * ■ ' ■ 



1C^3 



iQkete Walla's Jig. 



Vr- 4 ^^ s F— — - s F-- — jr P — ^— J-h-h^— I ' < •-+ » # 1 1 i~ - M *— m ■*-- 

"—-&■ — \-M-m — * i f — i f 1 ■-•-^ — i-+-# 1 # [—+-• — i ' — * — * — d — * 1 * — i — 



** 



: U^ 






m . 






-n-2 



•— P-t— F-m-i — r~ 



P=u 



V-L 



ifzfji^fz^™: i* 



H! 



r-*-S-it 



2^; 



New School for the Banjo. 39 

Niagara Falls Polka. 

5th Bob Barre No. 1. 2 1 3 ... „ „ „ , 

-««■ p*™wi| J^ 5th Pos. Barre No. 1. I""*™" I " ! f=» » 

— r^-fg-K- — — *-»Ha-«B*- -■■+-.-*---*? ■ — I — h«— -! — I — \ a — «-f — -*■ — i —t&d-a-*- ■g-^—'ra — ¥-\l 

*- ■!*— L"-^Offl— ^— — -#■ — ff -I—" I L — i — 1— — ■ — <-■— ±00— ^;— --tr*-»-2- -^ — I-*— v-Hl 

-_^ gj-r- ffl t ad = -*= t a-^ ^if-r^ g ^ t.. . t en 



- — ^ — I — - — V — ^ 



ft 



1<< 



-«_*. 



2* 

5th Pos. Barre No. 1. 
■9 <r. 






3r£ 



-» — <-s- -•-«-*-• 



53- 



«■- 



<-5 — <-h- 



-4~«- 



•<--«- 



Safe . . 



5H* 



ES 



"*«" 

^ 




2-£ 



5th Pos. Barre No. 1. 
•« — <-» — r 



s*= 



-» — <-5 






Rural Polka. 



F^+f%-^-»-F# 



i.a~^-#4-j — *-- '-^ — i— * 









** 



:^Q 




* — #- 



-#— #■ 



-#-(- 



-* F--1-0- 

*-| 2- 



^r-£ 



•*--»- 



fl»» 



^ — 



'J}*-? 



^Sf 



• — « 




^ 



Ob Che 3d String. 

8 10 8 7 

2 4 2 1 ! 




F**8 



>" -jfj5r* : 



_s 






i+ 



it* 




— -3- 

9 
2 



3t* 



tJfe 



g:«±»— •— *■ 



-1-0 ^_- 

-a — : «w — 



12 
4 

=F- 






D.C.. 




v, — i — \_ e — i — r J.. 
— — I — 0— I- 
« 0- 



:q=±:, 



1^11 



40 



The Alice Polka. 

Introduction. 



George C. Dobson's 
To Alice Loring Newcomb. 



By GEO. C. DOBSON, July, 1877. 
Polka. 



X^ . Pi-5 Polka. 

+- -#• -€■•#- i '■'■»■ -#-•*•-#- -a- -*- ■*■ ■*■ -»■ i „ . ' - *^ 



J|_tf 4;. 

n — ' — 0*-L 



F^|^:f_-.^ 



&=gSg-ri: 



♦•*■#. 



Jii-H-h 



gg|f^|||||j 



1 rm — • — 9 W T-m M r « ' — m — l~ — Ti 1 






fst. 






J N 










F#%=^= 



* 



#— *- 



I aaJ 1- 









5^4^M=^fl 



rtJrf 



•-• K~rK- 



S+r^-rfrr*- 






tef 



^i— «-=--*- 






:€=^s 



JZE 



l±t=P5 



^ 



it** 



fst. 












^±i- 



trd— i— 1— *■ 



g^* * 



_a_#_H_^. 



=J= 



ag£jt£: HH»-f- 



-#-#- 



-g^tf-g-H-- _■ 



-*-- r 



-i — r-*-^- 8*-j — 1 i; *— 



^=^-3 



mm 



New School for the Banjo. 



41 



F. H. Bond Schottisehe. 







The Oboe Clog. 

&- — &^-» 



G. C. D. 




-^ — i — ^~ 



~ : hT " i -j ; n T'Tn ! -T* 1 • •Sri ~P '• 1-4— '-2 zqz-^»>^: 



Fine. 



pdfct 






-»-*- 



-—#-*- 



^-4- — i-n-i "j-i ^-TS»- ! -'ik-^ = s--f- ^ — | ^ J Irr 1 »— J — H — i ^— 



F 



# 



•- 1 



-»— 4- 



J— I — -— #-* 



-■!■ 

-i4 



=# 



±-t= 



-D-C-55 






42 George C Dobson's 

Minor Jig. 

^H* PTTj f*"^ 3 3 

?-*-* — g-*-q — i — -^-r— ^- 



EM* 




=» 



"— i-r— <— 



-<-• — # 



d-T— I" 



-py--. 



5 h 



:q=*: 



faig-ic:j-g-r-n=:z=iz. 



j=t 



^f^=^B 



r™^2£" ™ j ^^ ^^i 5th Pos . 



— T __ (=#= 



3 2 



-• — i- 



111111111=1*11 









:J* 



<-— I — i—j A-*Z*^— > 






J55fe. 



T 1 i i ' i d - 

-0 0- 







Thoughtful Mazurka. 



New School for the Banjo. 



G. C. D. 



43 









ioaKc?ipaq^5=±±q 



£ 



F*fc 



— » — — » — t-^ -t-r- 1 







/««. Y -9cZ. 



?»!JT-±&- 



Jfc: 



^a 



*S 



■jHf-F 



/M. 






i ^ 



P=z=-i rigp=i=q= 



±fcfc 



Ffi 



1 i 



*i 



: zitzzzzi: 



*-«—#- 



=P=?: 



S??^ 



«-4- 



/*«. 



Y s* 



There's a Merry Welcome. 



tg- 



:p: 



ESliHf 



-<S>- 



H 



:*zz£zz 



■ m 1 U 



&u 



/st. 



zbzz: ^ ^-«=a— ^ d— g-jHzz^J 



^5* 



fczrzzzjzzztzzzjz 

IT -0- -0- -0- ■#■ 



-^ — I — ^~ 



fctzzzzzizz*: 



-I — ^ — i — m —+ ^ — rrr — ■ — • . 

z1zzt±ir^ZLZ=i±li-*iz:qi=tq=^=ii 



,; Fairy Waltz. 

| fe-^ zjz=zkzrzp^ 

^h±z—zf=L%z: zzzzzlzEf z: zzzlzj-'— jzfz: :z zJzizzEzzzezzzz zzzzzzlzzzlz: ztzzzlzzztz izjzj-* — jzf 



zizzj: 



:h: 



I 



J5ZZ^jz|: 



J J zTzzBzziz^zJzqzTz^zqz—^-iiz^ i,. ,_j == jzT jzzzzjzTzzBzzzazzLiiizz^ tzti 

zzz==z*:zzzizjz z1 z3z^^ 



44: George C. Dobson's 

Home, Sweet Home. (With Variation.) 



F ^y-^ F i 



5th Pos. 



3:e 



-t 



-it 



+ -# 



* 



-t*- 



zM 



3 



?=«=*= 



i3=El 




New School for the Banjo 
Home, Sweet Home. Concluded. 



45 



h — 1 a 1 — -J — * 1 d 



:i= 



3— ^=-3=S=^=i=33==^^3 




46 George C. Dobson's 

Charlie Brickwood's Favorite Polka. 

r Q i &Aa --F3 f"H— r- — ^-* — K-h— * 

-jFW^-j — d — * — g— -t^ — 2— ?«TT 



Geo. C. Dobson. 




New School for the Banjo. 



Beimie Jig. 

u Tune 4th to B. 

yw-^— r 






47 



: T*- ±-- 



n g-^-^-p— g -#— — • 



4 7 4 5 



*&Egg^m 



_ if , ^ 1 A 1 2 



-£^3- 






^^^=ife» 



=ra=pp; 



-#-s- 









ss:e 



:=F 



"■ i^Jz^bf 






£3t 






Walk Around. 



=« 






*£5 



1— #— •- 



^ipzrzpz^ 



t-z=J- 






SI 



-* — *- 



• — -#- 



__ r _ J=== ^ = 



-*— *■ 



■fVT 



4= 



fefcsfc 



11 



Rattlesnake Jig. 






:*^*-d— 5: 



-rf* 



-3 T-i^W- 



# .^i-z|^|i- 



^*r 









"•— 



- 1 -"t— * 



IZPZJIIL^PI 



J_aS_I_^ S_^L~i #_?_ ^— »— - 



-«_•_#- 



Sib: 



1 



48 



Uoming through the Bye. 



m~' 



George C. Dobson's 



=*- ir-a—a^-o-* — <-g-. — a L <-»- s -#-«- a -*- L - '-*--! P -i~<~a— - tf— — — l # _- tf _. — x. < _ tf ^Ji — # _l Jj 

< < < — (■ — »-. -+"#•-+ <— r <— I- 






6th Pos. 



&0-T+ 



/T\ /C\ 




US 



Spanish Retreat. 

Tune 4th to B. 

7 



JfM*g#F. 



v-i-f— 4 



-«_t-i — i 1 • — «? — *— «- 



zzzjzzz]ztzzrzz4:5: 



11 



Up! 



m 



zji: : — o^-Zjzjj-zLzjz: ^ m -Z\-.ztZt-Z\.z± 









J— |-_| " - 



— i — I — i — I — I — i- 



~rlzf=3z: 



6th Pos. Barre 



ZZOL 



zzt^qz^zEqz^zziz^ztzzJz^qzizfzd 

# -* -+ + •+ 



^zZ^z^zz ^-'---^ zt:^ 



5th Pos. Barre 



u il | | | ", ■ ■■ , m il 7thPos,Barr< 

L ¥^- « « L H-# i # H*— ±i=l- 




12 



-zNi 



J?*L 






izuzztiqzzz+zq^sz: 

i — I l-J — — 

zz^qz^ztzzzz, 




l M 



19 P 

M 



—I 3 1 r 

*zzS=izg=3 

— L_j — 1 — 



=fc 



ate 



.^zzzzi-t 



=1 — i — :=4— .: ■ ;TH-^=HZ^zz!zzbzz:|| 
ztz** z?*zztz*?z^ ~\~m m — * «T11 



New School for the Banjo. 



49 



Star Spangled Banner. 



:S fe?s 



*=* 






:xzz 



i — #- 



_i — 



t3: 



-*-»- 



-sSi*- 



■*V 



u fi>- 



£=M 



: ^=^ 



■J 



fel 



# ^ 



p**£ 



r-*s 



■I — ■ — I— 



13 



gt=* 



•• T0- 



■&r 



* 



4- 



s± 



:±q: 



-«-*- 



*=*=* 



^K 



I 



m 



«=, 



-w — *- 



-0-*-* 



±3=£ 



+ * 



-| 1 j 1— +-x4 



a* 



b 



T- 



~i- 



0^r» 



& 



I 



Philadelphia Favorite. 



4 7 

10 4 12 

*»-f-g-»- 



E|=g g *3gr^g 




tf 



£e£eE 




-*- ■ ' ^ ._ M M -X-L^ -^ -*• 



50 George C. Dobson's 

ZjQflftA- — a^—.'-'-J^—m— LlZZ — j_I- '.-.^ZZZf-ZZZy^Zm-^g 1 — \z~ ™ 

\ —&r -±— "■" -» • ■ ■ ■ I —0 -J 



^ — #- 



53 




}' 



pg^fl 



^tftlfi 



On Yonder Rock. (From Fra Diavolo.) 



T=t 



£=2 



1± 



& 



fegi^sttp 



,»— ^ 



V-J- 



J 



-3- 




a 



s-r 



-^-■-•r. — — 



nt: 



#=- 






c=q: 



8th P e». Ba rre Mo. *. V 5th Poi.Ba 
3- »I ^>- I- 

ifc£?-T-^ 



Jit 



rre Xu, 1. 

I 



lloCQ 



— r 



10 1 



5fc=fc 



H ^ 1 1 F™1-t<-*-7 

—-0—*—*—j 1- tf^ 

j g p* » : :tSn 



4 I 



1EE 



-H-<— I 1- 



«-h 



#-^ 



5 i^0 



,.uCi Minor. A 7*2™., — 

t gjzizzziftzfzzv * gi^zzzz?^ 



New School for the Banjo. 



Irish Jig. 

*t W\r\tw* 



ol 






8 Pm. 



N, 3 



l.... # I*_fl_B # — |1_ — ^__ 1 «»»^- 1 ^J *-- L -4- JJ: 

*& 

i 



7 Barre 



^ 3 , 3 A 



--jH®& -y:*"|— yr -[— gF riizzrcrzrip :*zpz^z*tp£ ifzfzfctzzz* ^tzczizztibzizzzzpz'z^zzz: zzz'zpzjz:}: j: 
Clog Hornpipe. 

— -a — 1 , . b — s^^ — 



pi^zp 



JOS. RICKETT. 



esee 



*-ff I»IZS ■ ■■j t/mm 



Fi'&rate." 



~ Z_«_ZIZZ2ZZfi— ^SmiS" Z ' — ' • " : 

ud~JZ?£ZiZ iT?zrft- *"~J 1" >~ TJ 



:zj: 

h. Fine. 



^g^fe^^^^^^ZjZ 4zro s^^^^^ 



5th pos. 

6 

2 



- 1 ' M 



■0s— I- 



*■ 



##T 



•zzzj 



:afc 



.v.-.-^f-p-^p- 



Stt,, 1 a 1 3 a 1 4 i— 



^T 



y. 



Clog Hornpipe. 






Hi 



D.C.alJine.. 



* 



jos. eickett; 

,S> j} js ^ ft 



N K — ^ N 



-1 — p — ( — ",--F — 1 — 1 F — 



^--H «^- 



fefi^-- 






g-ipiziz = b=±t--— ^z± 






* & 



Ef^zE:.E:E3:*E=EiS 



ZZZ~ 



52 



Clog Hornpipe, Concluded. 

N « -*• 2 1 V I S4 M 



George C. Dobson's 




5Po». s 




k£»ffii jffi g5S5 ^^^ E=^| 




Over There. 
No. 4. 
Play Prelude Baujo style 



EATNTJO SONG. 



JOS. KICKETT. 




ife-ISii 



$= 



* 



11 



->-- 1- 



5 • — 



^T=4 



$=4 



-*— jg- 



3=£ 



-H 1- 



-#— •-' 



Oh a crow sat, on a tree o - ver there. 



Oh a 






M 



tf:_*_ # _«: 



v_^_>_^. 



V-L: 



?=£=* 



— -H- -H — h- — H— I- 



^~r-'"g :p: 



crow sat on a tree o - ver there, 



£-ti^£-V-*- 



P=»- 



-v— * 



v — * — L 



frfdM* 



^-?-u: 



N--N— n- 



/TN 



-I- 1- 



*—+ 



3& 



m 



7X«X V 



A crow sat on a tree says he tome,says he seventeen from sev'n leaves,three Over there. 



ft 



3C 



*=£ 



*~ 



* 



- m ■ * r wr 



-m # «- 

-m # m- 

5 i « 



i^^ 



New. School for the Banjo. 53 

Strauss Thousand and One Nights Waltz. Arranged for the Banjo by napoleon w. gotjld. 



m*i 



■&■ 



W±&. 



— 1 + 



I 



-A —T^.hjL^J. — J. r .pNj J___r^__j__i_ T _4. i 

-^ —4- -0 9 — #i_ -i-m — ■. a 9 — 9 1 «_ -M * 



^ 4+ -f* 1— ' 1 i 1 r I Ul I J I! f^*-?. -0 



1 ! ! ^ ! - 



# 



^-J^^^B— ^^ * .-[■ .1 == 

p~ i i i i r i i i i i i i i jFj te ♦ 

I I *"".#..#. .#. 4« 4- ^ II I I' *"^ •#>■ -#> 



J 



fF=B Bffi 



H-** 9 



& 



rrr 



B.C. 



zw=z* 



I ! 



r^A:_z&:'=mzi 



mmlU 






r r 



# — # 



_ — i — i-gtg- 

5- fc - 



J I I ! I 
r-i l *■<♦. i N 

-F-H-^a -r — H g ^ ~ 



-#-#- 



-*5<-* 



■#- ■*•-&- U -^ 



rf*feL=^ 



*s 



j» 

# a..* 

* — • — • 



" # ZZ 

IT" 



3* 



fc fr 



/st time. 



— f- 
±Z25t 



£J 



• p * 

i f 



1 i 



' — * — ;-' <s* 



I 






i*"l 
ft 



r^r 



Y PcZ time. 

I 



Z>.C7. 






-^— ir-r 



i 



zjEffi 3bKJz*:aJzi«if -::«*zzzzzzz[4 - ::^-fzfiz=z===ijf-*^fi ^^ i::iJ^==giz^= = 1— ^ 

c nz — a: — i 1 J~#- — #-i- J — #-»-# J -# — • — *- L -w — » — a- 1 4rr — -l-# m- « — n i 

^- ^- I L-T i i l i i I i I i 5=- J'5: ♦ ♦ " * Ksr?: 

i i I I I f u-J I I 



54 



George C. Dobson's 



pdMf 



Strauss Thousand and One Nights Waltz. Continued. 



fst time. 



m 



<■--&--* — 



-0 — # 






1 



£5=* 



an 



1 — I- 

I — I- 



i ,£tZ time. , . 

-r«- 1 1 1 T ~ I 1 l-r-H 1 ■ | — 



*m. 



r 



nst 



I 






:*=*=q 



! i ' ! ' ■ '. i i i j i i| 



I | 5: 1 1 5:. ^ ♦■ ♦ * 3p 



-£L-J 



11 11 

r r j r rr f f ' \ rr rr 



i§g§ 



* 



.J^^-H^^-. 



1^~T 1^ 1*^ T-H-i—I-H l-#-J l- T 1 '■ ^— r- 



VhtT Y <&/. ~1 



SE^^i^fe 



Fi ! — T--S-- 



i^— # 



• ■- -d-= 







«d 



g -q-*-*-S -* 



n&*> 



-f— 



p p p 



frzzzfr 



-dak 



■T-<S- 



:ti: 



1 1 



i ^tr 7 * » z m: 



XZT^Z 



~P P P 
I I I 



111 I 

.0 — a-\-0 - - 



-0—0 — 



?E'3E?E»=EE3 



Tf-^r 



New School for the Banjo. 
Strauss Thous and and O ne Nights Waltz. Concluded. 

i 2d time. 



55 



fslttme. mc^ o^ 



$£&£££ 



S*=- 



:zt 



:fci: 



d: 



-1 — ,-H-H- 1 I— 

4zzi*-if. ~& — '— ' '&— 
. nzztt-iS-t. li^m 



J. 






:<C=C 






Repeat 1st Movement and Finale. 

:ft:g=^i: 



i 



i i 



— ^ •• * 



:•=*: 



zz^zzPzzPzzzzzzMz: ~ — *— •— *— jzzzz ~i=*=r*=:*z tj%l 

:- z=z±=S± — - — ±z m f — g iizsjf: 



'•&-' 



f 



3 



yg^p^ 



* 



T r-i9- 



:lzS: 



i 






■—<&- 



#2E 



-«- . 



J- . 



: ^F= Fg^ 



i i 
J- . 



a 8 ? 



e 



.a*. 



I - I 



•&- • 



-&- • 



Bennie Jig. 



r - 



-«»- • 



G. C. D. 




— « 1 — ' — r — i — i — -d — # — — i- 



jgpfc^&jjl 




1 4 






Ei^£_Sf 



56 



Valliance Polka Militaire. 



George C. Dobson's 



Compotw-d by J. ASHER. 
Arranged py JOS. RICKEIT. 




--4— •- L ~ I • # — m — •- L « — ■.,.■— J 



P^-Ej^3 



-# ( — i — I mm 1 F- S ! t5- S^«- 



< ft 







£_= J— #— J^ T?- J-i-J-T TI""I ^-+^- 

i r r i ^ ^ 



.#L # , » 



*:, > 







r-fl: 


4J-4— 


H 1 — 


— i-i 


r i^ F 


I3l 
frv 


^-=r~3 


! — 8— 


# 


-B — # — #- 
-F— • •- 


.UQz _j 


L1*J — L 



— I- 






iEE!^L- J= ^ 



New School for the Banjo. 
Valliance Polka Militaire. Continued. 

_4 



57 






3 po *-* & 



F*tf 



^ 



J — s 




5X 
4 



St 



-f— h 



-JfTZMZZM- 



its=}~kz 



dafcafcfc: 



-•-* -•-*- 



i^i 



^^ 



:^f:;====2£l^E5=zzz^fei 



2=3***i*=*x3= 






JJEEBglEEE ^--*— $ 




i 



#— # — -m— a i_q^_a_ — 5—5=5 

-f — f -+ -gf- hw I 



*• *■ # 



u 



molto , 

N ? 2 2 



-h #- 



:r^ 



>? 



• < . K l l l 

1^— f— r-P f r=j=z #z^S 



m. 






-2— # 



inuendo. jm Semper. 



W 



v -» — »— » — •- 

-r 1 ! 1 i — 



-t-i=: 



r^jgEp^ ^3= s=^=|: 



r 



58 



13 Hw. 



George C. Dobson's 
Vallianee Polka Militaire. Concluded, 



^ 1 7 Barre. 



g^^gmwm 






JM= 






Rickett's Drum Solo, 

Introduction play Banjo style. 




gEg plj 




55 



^^g| ^^gj?^=^^g EJ 



-T— <"J^- 



"^ 



_# 



5 Bane 

N 















i 







\ \ 3 Prom. I 7 po».9* 3 4 

i m Pr nm. V S 1 — ^■"■^■■5 ,"""l 13 m, ■#• Pram, "#■ « 

fl-- <--#_ i-j • • — 0- - — — I— p — l. .<-«^- — ,_ -1-0 — » — *_ x_p_i \— -0 !•-■-# ha 

«~« !-■ i ! L^ — i 1-^—3 1 L« !-•-- i— ' — 






J** 



1* «>x 
-* 2 



P *M 



b/»<- b f 



fc*d. 



*=! 



ISH 



=§=$ 



2 

1 






=P-q 



i=d 






HB3 



J Jzc: 



1 3, 



j i t 



:i2c: 



I 



New School for the Banjo 
Rickett's Drum Solo. Concluded. 



59 



Bnrrc 



I f™^ I I lOBn 



■'¥ 



p±b=^-.d 



i- * 



lOBmrrc. 1 



I 



3: 



£ 



irrrgzi^: 









ES 



T-J- 



I I 



-0- 
-0- 



\ 



Dram. 






LEE «Z^ |_5_ a _ 4 X._« ^__M_i<.«_ 



*:•=*: 



H 1- 



^ 



«=*¥= 



5X- 
2 



3i=*: 



=S5=tt= 



:»i«: 



5*- 
2 



11= 



<- — |- 
*Otf- 

8*^ 






:rp 



-0-9- 



;t— rr 



4— •— 0— 



_| 1 ■_ 



^T=i: 



3 ». 



i Tr-f 



£EIE6?E33EEES 



r~ 



:*: 






;£=* 



f 



&$£ 



$m 



E3 



£-J-*J-d-*- 



g*EEl 




fe^^l^^EfEi 



P 



*m 



,10 Bo r re. 1 4 N N IOBarre. 1 

r[. J • v j^j -E ^"' - 



-^— -■--, — 



^!=j: 



-*=fi* 



rrrzt 



ft. * r 



R - •* -0r -0r -0r -0r -0r 



*3Zl£g 



O. 



H 



■0- -*•&• 



60 



George C. Dobson'a 



pdt&l 



Stroke March, 



G. C. D. 






r-t- 






-*f 



1 



¥ 



tf 



r- 



rp„2 



s=zx 



X=t±t=i=T 




--<-■ 



-#*- 



-d-l • 

-f^n 9 • • 

+- — ' ! r-i 



E*fe=33EEfe 



\~\ 1 • -J- 



'St 



-0 

I — F- 



f — 0- 



]- T --J 



9 -T- 






'— * 



=S^ 



-0-. -0 0-3- 



pdtdb 



i 



SSE 



-9-f — T 



-M-#- 



^=«=«=&^E^E? 



-J F 



H F- 



-•— #— ^7^* — *" 



^ 



;^^ 



U 



fc=-=g-T rre ai 



Ttztr 



^z:^ 



IS 



«— * 



**±j=± 



-0 - 



^H 



PT=P= 



ff L~"~'' ~"~" j ' H ~ 



:p — - 7 # ? 



-• — # — #- 



"« — •- 



IE g 



S3 



-# — — 0- 



0—gr 



l=z 



-0— 



-¥--- 



% 



I- 



■fcf" 



-■*- # - 



#-!•- 






-f— i- 



-*#- 



-5Q-P 



■a=£± 



1 



New School for the Ban]©. 
Wait till the Moonlight falls on the Water. 

For Banjo by GEORGE C. DOBSON.. 
Tune the fourth string to A, or to key-note most suitable to voice, then play as written. 

Tempo di Marcia. 
„ u, Banjo. 

UPS 







*-Jrr 



Words and Music bv S. BAGNALL. 



-*— •- 



:3 



61 




Voice. 



-T 



-4 ^r— # 

1. Cease your re-pin - ing, 

2. Soft - ly the moon - light 

3. Home - ward re- treat - ing, 



±± 



— * 



♦r— 



-- 1- 



Bright eyes are shin - ing, 

Falls on the stream - let, 

Sad heart a beat - ing, 



t + 



-v- 



-A 1 — I — * 



~& 



Fond hearts are melt - ing with fer - vent love ; 

Sil - v'ringeach rip - pie with bril - liant ray; 

'Cause she must bid you the last good night ; 





*-. 



— I \, — _j 

— (■ •#■• • 

Eed cheeks are pal - ing, Sweet -heart be - wail 
Out in the still night, JAak - ing the ■heart 
She fond - ly wish - es Those sto-len kiss 



-fr--»-r 



■* — fe 1 ~ 



+Z 



ing, Tar-ry not a momentfrom the girl you love, 

light, Waking up the dick - ey-birds before the break of day. 
- es, Would last till the morn - lug's broad day - light. 

J- 



62 Gee 

j. Wait till the Moonlight falls on the 

fe zg — a— ^— j r j — — »— j- - * • ■ 5 



George C. Dobson's 

Water. Concluded. 

-i J 



I — 

She's sure to cheer 

Co-quetting and flirt 

Now comes the tri - 



mm. 



jszi 



-V 



you, 

fog, 

al, 



When 

Kiss 

Her 

'4 









she comes near you, She's ev - er wait-ing for the sweet, sweet kiss; 

ing and teas- ing, Tell-ing lots of lit- tie fibs, and say - ing they are true; 
home is in sight, The cord must bo snapp'd that us fond ly u - nito ; 




If you're in - clin'd for a mid - night ram - ble, Tell me what you think a - bout a scene like this. 
Some say it's naughty, but still it's ve - ry pleas -ing, Just wait a moment, and I'll tell you what to do. 

Her face is upturned for a last fare - well kiss, And she whisper'd some words that fill'd me with bliss. 




Wait till, the moonlight falls on the wa-ter, Then take your sweetheart out for a walk ; Mind what you say, boys, 




i 



that's how you court her, 



^= g =v 



♦ _+*♦- ♦ * 3 

Tell her that you'll wed her wheu the days grow short. 



dp 






<■#■ 4-^*- 



New School for the Banjo. 
Don't You Wish You Could. (Song and Dance.) 



63 



Composed and Arranged 
By HENEY C. DOBSON. 



;* 







'SS— N-Nr-fcr 



* 



-&-* -^~N~N- 



V # * ' 



rain 



*F 



1 \— \ — \ — \-l 



-•-#-/ 



Oh such a beaut\r I ne'er can forget, li the' park wliile walking the first time we met; Her sunny curls were peeping Be - 

The next time I met her how we did chat , The rain was falling fast, and spoilt her lit - tie hat ; And as I tried to kiss her while 



^^ hs- rrr ^, rm iy ,= ^ fi 

1 H -F# — # — o — #-L H -* * P_«_X- J _ # ^T_ # H# # _l ,—f # L - i— # # [-• « — ' 






FINE. 



CHORUS. 






Nt-N 






N-N 



tf-*r-V 



F — n— -» 



■*--*- 



^fr-jfr-fr-fr-ftgr 



~»~€ _ »~* — N^Vi 






aeath her lit - tie hood, And as I tried to catch her "said" "Now don't you wish you could." Looking like a daisy , 
at thedoor we stood, She winked at me and then she said "Now don't you wish you could." I called upon her nightly, 

5 !S 



H- T -> 






1 

She 



tho't I should go crazy, 
treated me politely, 




-*"*-- 



±— fcr 






"fr— fr— fcr-=" 



When she threw a glance at me, 
I asked her if sheM marry me, 



-v — VJ.-V- 



M-M- 




> tt ! ' ; ! ^ N N S 



I scarce knew where I stood, Oh! wouldn't you like to see her now, Oh! don't you wish you could. Oh! 
It was all un-der-Btood, Oh! wouldn't you like tobein my place, Oh! don't you wishyou could. Oh! 



m 






Ah 



-***-, 



W 



£ 



it 



.%--+- 



%*=%&- 



4* 



<T0- 






I 






DANCE. 



# — 



Ep^jfc^s 




3 



BJRggUi^^r tl "Tg; a - '3fr *g Br 




64 



Shells we Gathered Years ago. 

Words by GR033-H COOPES. 



te!z»=*;g3 ±5 




George C. Dobson's 



For Banjo by GEO. C. D0B30X. 



Music by HARRY BIRCH. 

Author of "Hiding on a Load of flay" dc. 






m 



m 



±Jjti 



The 
The 
The 



shells 
shells 
shells 



we gathered years 
we gathered years 
we gathered years 



* — N"ft ~ ^r~»- ~i — 



mm 



~* *A 



go, 
go. 
go, 






While stroll • ing by the Rammer 
Wiih lov - ing comrades blithe and 
Ah, coul d we gath-er once a - 



L^_| X_« # _#-_.I J . # 1 _,_ # — m }__ # 0-L-4-0 — — — #-I~ 1 — — - — #-J 

%£■• ♦ ♦ ' 5h ♦ ^ It 



:>- 



*— /- 



q: 



**-=f*— a 



ev' 
foam 
all 



"fpSg 



ry joy the heart could know, 
y waves, as white as snow, 
the joys we then did kn ow, 



V— ^ — /— + — *- 



^" 



Was fond - ly shared by you and me ; Oh, 

Were laugh - ing round us in their play : * No 
And hearts untouched by grief or pain! Up • 



sSi 



-^^^^^^-i — l-HH-J-l-tH' 



could we lin - ger once a - gain, 
more we see their .fa - ces kind, 
on tBe shores of time we stand, 



+*■ 

And 
No 
Till 



:i # ^ # « # _ 



0-0-0- 



**-**-*& 



-0—0—0- 



-0-0- 



*.*i*0 



m£mm 



-10-0- - - 



-0—0- 



'•) 



fr-- N" 






:^= 



I ! '- I (-, J H 



- ten to the ocean's roar; 

we gaze in eyes so bright; 

de -part- ing days are done, 

3=±Hat 



W?tl 



r 



-0-m 



nth-, hearts, untouched by wea-ry pain*. 
Like foot -. steps that we left be -hind;. 
Like shells up - on • the o-cean's strand, 



■V—V- 



As when we played ap - on the shore. 
They've fa - - d«d from our earth - ly sight. 
Wfi lose our treasures, one by - one. 



W*I»± 



wsm 



„ u CHORUS. 







— 1 1 t-i — i ! . • ; ri 



!*£* 



- -&- 







■^ Str oll - ing o n the sea-be at shore. With ev' - ry joy the heart couldinow, Was fond - ly shared by you and me, The shells wegathered years a - go. 



A Starry Night for a Ramble. 

O J * 



New School for the Banjo. 
For Banjo by GEO. C. DOBSON. 



65 



-.tt-izi 



::wr^:tzN 



zpfcir* 
— 



^m* 



». 



4Q=*C 



By SAMUEL BAGNALL. 



V-J-! 



— I— 
-*_- 1— j. 



qzzq:* 



\ 



-W& 



1. I like a game at Cro - quet or bowling on the green, 

2. Talk a - bout your bath - ing or strolling on the sands, 

3. I. 'like to take my sweet-heart, "of course you would," said he, 

4. Some will choose ve - lo - cipede.and o - thcr st ake a drive, 






-*n 



♦ ■#■ * — f — f - + — + — * — (• 



I like a lit - tie boat - ing to 
By some un-seen ver - ran - dan where 
And soft - ly whis- per in her ear "how 
And some will set and mope at home half 

._)_ ■_ ■_. ^4-^_ zj: . 



# 



:« 



v-j- 






3: 



P=«=p: 



^_ 



=t 



3=$ 



H 



-- H-H- 

pull against the stream ; But of all the games that I love best to fill me with de - light, 

gen - tie zephyr fans, Or roll - ing home in the morning boys, and ve -ry near- ly tight, 

dear-ly I love you," And when you pic - ture to yourselves the scenes of such de light, 

dead and half a - live, And som e will ch oose a steam - boat, and oth-ers e - ven fight, 



\-)--V 



qzztztit^fi:^ 



I like to take 
Could nev - er beat 
You'll want to take 



#*v 



32* 



ffi 



tert 






a ram - ble up - on 
a ram - ble up - on 
a ram - ble up - on 
But I'll en- joy my ram - b l e up - on 



a star- ry night, 

a star- ry night, 

a star- ry night. 

a_ st ar- rv night. 

•i-h — I [ ■ ii 



H""W— f^^ -i — ^^ —^ m F m i — i — I— '— i— I— I— I— 1-— f — H — 1 — \— I— I 




^3*3|^j 



6(> 



George C. Dobson's 




WITHOUT STUDY- 



The Key, 



(Five lines.) 



Jive lines, thus: 



(Five Strings of the Banjo.) 
1 

2 

3 

4 



represent the five strings of the 
Banjo, thus ; 



The five lines upon which the music is written, number from the 
aippermost downwards, 1. 2. 3. 4. 5, [when the Banjo is held in proper 
position on .the Centre of the right thigh,] represents the five strings 
>of the Banjo numbering uppermost 1, 2, 3, 4, 5. The shortest string 
•on the Banjo is the^fifth.* 



* See Part 2d. for manner of Holding, Tuning, Fingering, Stroking, &c, 
Two kind of characters only, are made use of to express arelosed 



:and an open string. The round ring thus ; — &> — signifies the third 



string one time open, or one open note produced on the third string. 
The black dot, thus : — # — signifies the third string one time 



-closed, or one closed note, produced by placing the second finger of 
■the left hand endwise on the second fret.* 



* See Part 2d. in reference to frets and fretting the Banjo. 



Whatever line the first note is written on, strike or pick the cor- 
responding string on the Banjo, to commence the piece. There are so 
many closed notes represented by the black dot only, and those are 
as follows. — The second string closed at the first fret with the first 
finger, the first, third, and fourth string closed at the second fret with 
the second finger. This is the usual left hand fingering for the first 
chord in the first position. When a different position is required, 
there will be added two figures, the lower one indicating the finger em- 
ployed to stop the string, whil the upper figures will indicate the fret 
at which it is stopped, 



. 



A Cross (X) added to a note thus ; 



refers to the little fin- 



ger of the left hand, if it occurs with the black dot only, then the string 
is to be closed at the third fret, no matter on what fine it may be 
written, stop the corresponding string at the third fret, with the little 
finger. 

IX 



When a figure fs added to a cross, thus: 
is to stop the string on the given fret. 

Example. 



the little finger 



7X 



The little finger on. the seventh fret. 



One figure only added to a note, refers to the finger of the left 
hand employed to stop the string, also the fret at which it Is stopped. 



New School for the Banjo. 



67 



Example. No. 1. 



Example. No. 2, 



5 1 &- 



&- 



II 



1 
2 

5— 



!-(&- 



ii 



The letter S, added to a note, is the sign for snapping the string, 
After having first produced the closed note, pull the finger of the (left 
haod) quickly sideways off the string, which gives another note on the 
open string, without again striking or picking the string with the right 
hand. Snap or snapping is principally used in quick pieces to facilitate 
the execution. When there is not enough open or closed notes in any 
piece or exercise written to complete each measure, rests will be sub- 
stituted to fill out the count, as follows, — (Rests are fully explained in 
Part First aud bow to count time.) 

Example, 



Yankee Doodle. J time. 



if See 

6--*- 



■0 — »- 



-G— T 



■G>- 



-0 — &——■ -0 



G> 



G> 



-&—0-T 



G- 



-&■ 



I* 



m 



-G>—0- 



4hG~ 
5 



-r-5— 0-G> n 








i-0 --- 


-G> ^ — -g>- 

-+—£> — 


fe"^~ 


*^= 


\r — 


—0- : 


■<5> 


1 



1 
2 
3 
4 

ft 








p. M 


X 

-0- 




















::t- 




^ 


*3 - L - 






. w - 


- It 


w ' •»""" 










m 


' — g- 


-& 




L &- 








•o- ■ 





1|— 



1 — G—G- 



j- — .— (& . 



-G — 0- 



-G— 



■•— tr 



m\ 



Exercise in J time. V 



iPf 



-S?-T 



ftafc 



-g- 



-g 



-G- 



-&—T 



Twcflnge*-* down, the first fliieor 
on kaie > v. ond ntrlne, the second 
finger on the flint sr liitr. 



■ G 



— &- 



Two finger* down, the first finger 
on the second string, the second 
finger on the fourth string. 



&- 



-G~ 



-G~ 



-G 1 



-G- 



—&- 



■ -G- 



-Gh 



-&—T 



-G- 



— G- 



E 



'-- — a- 



-G— \ 



-a- 



-&- 



-g- 



-&- 



<&- 



Mi 



The Same Exercise. 

Picking up with the first and second fingers two notes at one and 
the same time, 

Two or more notes struck or picked at one and the same time 
are called a chord. 




-Gh 



-g—g—g- 



Gh 



-G—G- 
-G-G- 



■■Gh 



-0 1 



-G>- 



■*&- 



->20- 



20- 



*g- 



-g- 



-20- 



*=f 



■G- 



& 



=£-+ 



-G>- 



m 



hand. 



l 
a 

3- 



Exercise. 

Introduciug the Cross (X), the sign for the little finger of the left; 



^ 




1 

-0- 


S- 


1 

-0- 


4- 


G- 















i a 



x 

-0- 



68 



George C. Dobson's 



-<s>- 



-&- 



■ -&- 



-&- 



-&- 



-&- 



E*3 



*■-&- 







2 1 * 


2 1 X Z 





ma 





o o 


0.. 0. . 


& ' ° 


a 


# _? ^_ 






L _ — J 









— * <5>- 






&- 










" T 




-&-^- 


-&— 




-e^— 


-&— 




— m- 


s~> 


— *-- 


-Cr 




/*3 






m 




\~& J 


l — 4— L 



-&- 



11 



In the third measure of the above exercise place the second fin- 
ger on the third string, the first finger on the second string, then place 
the little finger at the third fret, first string. Fix the fingers in this 
manner before, playing any note in the measure, then retain them so 
until the third and fourth measures are performed. Then place down 
rthe two fingers again as in the first measure, before playing any note 
in the fifth measure. 

Exereise. 

Introducing three notes to be played at one and the slime time. 




<0- 



When a sign, the Curved line, occurs before a chord thus ; -* ^ 

it indicates that one note is to be struck or picked quickly after each 
other, commencing with the lowest note, which has a more elegant 
effect on the banjo than a chord struck at one and the same time. As 
the fifth string is the highest note in the following chord, the note oc- 
curring on the third string would be the lowest. 



x 



H=» 



-&- 



Written. 



m 



Played, 



Exercise in chords having curved lines. 



-<-«2~f«3-f<§- 



zfe 



-<-l <H <--! 

--frg~<r(g-<(g- 



Et 



tr0—<c0—<r0- 

<r0— *0— +#- 

<-|g-<-<g-<-|g>- 



-^0—^0—^0- 






Robinson Crusoe. 



f i g g? g ^ » 



3E 



<S? 



-&- 



-&- 



— ■*&- 



— <-(©>- 

-& *c&>- 



-&- 



-&- 



r-<g 



% 



-&- 



-<S>- 






-&- 



-&- 



The Banjo on my Knee. 



New School for the Banjo. 



69 



ES 



-&- 



& 



-iS> <5> 0- 



-&- 



-&- 



T& <5>- 



-0 — <S>- 



-0-*-^-G>- 



-&—<S>—9~r&- 



&—— <S> 



-<5>—0 



l*=Z^ZSf=+=^ 



-<5>- 



-& .5?- 



-&- 



-tS> 0- 



-<S>—<5>- 



-0—&- 



f-0-^—n— 



k 



&—- 



<&- 



-<S>—&—0- 



-&- 



-<s>- 



■G> <5>- 



<5>—0 — 0— -<5> 



Chorus. 



m 




rfSr 




-0- 


^&~ 


—&- 










-&- 


--&- 


-0—, 


r-&- 
















■ I 


1 1 


1 1 






















1-T7 *l *! 1 


<S> 1 


Jd ' 


" " 












\ 


I 


i^r 














' '' IP 




- 


— <s> 






* 








It 



The Young Man .from Canorsey. 



In 



■——0 

■<5>—-—0- 



■tg-X — ^ — G>- 
4 



-<5>- 



-0 & 0- 



-<5>- 



-*t—*—&- 



-0 — 0- 



-G> 0- 



&> \ */ — G>- 



-0 — G>- 



Chorus. 


















/*3 














w 








& 


m II 




•» 


» . 


1 


' m " 


f-l **. +1 sn 







m 




1 1 II 




j j 


1 


1 


& 1 7 <^ 




a x 1 & 




■ ' II 




L & & J 


1 -<S> — &- 


(S»— i 


t& : 1 




' - 


l 4 




II 



Joe's Jig. 



4am 


r ■=-* 


— <s> 


s - 




" <g ^ g 


-&—-=—& — i 








m 




fi 


-0- 


m 


-&- 


» 


Si: 


4 m m 


,2 * 




«*3 ^? # 


« ^ 


C* 
























&* & 1 


- C 






















4 & -a 







L ,« 1 







_._ 


0' 


-#- 


-<5>— i 




-<&- 




-<©-- 






X 


-»- 


-f»- 






-^-, 




-i&- 




— <£?- 




-0- 




X 

<~0— 


— 0— 


— <g- 






*1 








— :S>— 




— •- 




1 # « 






—&- 




—0- 












—0 — 


*> 








1 m 


■ & 1 




1— & J 


&> 


1 


L 0-1 


I 1 









— - 


-#- 


x ■ 


-<s»- 






"V 














^ . 






-x 


^-— — »— 


. ... .. 


— 0— 




— <g— 




r -ff — #- 


-•-i 




-&— 


^^* 


—&- 




-0 


r-0 0- 


-& M 


— — 


1 ^ a * • 






■ &^ 




— 1^ — — 


_^ 




& 









" m 


& 


-o*> 








— »— 




-&— 














_E £>_ 


L- 0- 
































&— 








1 


L ■- ■- -- 



70 



George C. Dobson's 



Waltz, 



mssm 






-0-0 



--<s>- 



-0T& / 



-0-0 



<£>- 



<&- 



S>—^S> 



mBi 



VI 



&- 



#-gL«-/o-«, m-m. 


X 






— — 

S m 


■0-&-&- 







s ?-*■■ 


-^Jl 


& , 




L<5» 


L — ^ — J 




&\\ 



M 



Those Good Old Days. 



4 5 
2 4 



4 6 
2 4 



■»— & 0- 



-&- 



-0 0- 



-&* 



-0 — &- 



-0 &- 



-0 <&- 



-&- 



-0 0- 



-&— 



-&- 



4 6 

2 4 



-&- 0- 



J *—&- 



— as — 0- 



s>- 



-0 — 0- 



-G> — 



-&- 



4 5 
2 4 



^_ 



*&- 



-& 0- 



-&- 



-& — 0- 



±1 



-0 — &- 



-0 — & — 0- 



-& — 0- 



-&- 



-0 — <s>- 



-<5>- 



-0—0- 



-&>- 



J f- 



■&- 



-&- 



-<5>- 



■&—0 — — &- 



4 6 
2 4 



-<S>- 



4 5 
2 4 



a 



-<S>- 



-6>- 



-G>- 



-&- 



^—&- 



■0 — &- 



&- 



-0 0- 



-&- 



-0 — (5>- 



-0—1&- 



■0 — G—0- 



-0-0- 



-fSh--0- 



Shoo Fly. 



A 



Hi 



-<&- 



-0 — — — 0- 



-&- 



-&■ 



-*?-*-&- 



-0 — — 0—0- 



-0 0- 



r i 



&> 7 7 g >- 



& — <§ — <g — <g- 



•& & iS> iS> 



^ 



J?-y©- 



# 



-<g — €- 



-<&- 



-& — 0- 



igzgjfl 



Chorus. 




« c 






















- ■-- 




X 












2 


-•— 


_>o — 






" « 






&* 




£r 






» : ^ 


V 




-^— 




— &f 


.^ p , 


&/ 




^ 


■ # 


7 


7 




■ &><■ 


-*- 


v • 


7 


_. ■ Sf . 


* 




?_ tS? . 












' ,! ~^' 


' 




-&- 


—(9- 


—<&- 







-# — »=--# — #- 

-# # 0- 



-7 7 g - 



r<5>- 



-7—7-^- 



-<g £>~^& <S>- 



^ 



•<©- 



-7-^7—^- 



-S^-*- 



^ t *» 



l r 



u 



-<s>- 



Bar de News. 



F4-- 



^<*- 



•($> — —0 



u- .a 



x — #- 



: -?-7- 



-&- 



-&- 



±=#=z=+^. 



4— *- - & fc * 



New School for the Banjo. 



71 



Melody with Accompaniment. 



4 ~ *~ 



5=5=^^ 



■ —&- 



^E^EEEi 



-<5>- 



-<S>- 



--t=l==l: 



¥ 



&—<§>—<S> <£> <S> <e>- T ~<2r- <§ — <§ '■ — € — • — »• 



¥ 



-&- 



-& -&—& 0- 



- —&- 



&—& — <S>- 



-0—0- 



-&- 



<5>- 



•g g g g g g 



-dS 1 - 



-0 — 9 — » # » — » 



-($'- 



-£? 



-<S>- 



sJjJ 



6? — # US' 



-g #- 



-tg- 



-<s>- 






ff — £ - ? 



^<2r—<2r 



- -&- 



-& <5>- 



-• — 0—0- 



-0 — -0 0- 



-&- 



-&—&r 



-&- 



-<5>—<S>- 



— — — 0- 



-&- 



-&- 



-iS>- 



m 



Chorus. 

4 




7 






















— <s> — 


1 


1 




? 




f( 


& — 


,_.j£ir 




w 


&r 












^ 


1 














/ 


t 


* 










*T1 
















^ 






























•z 'if * - 






. g ... 


5j 


% 










* 


g 


" ^ " 


" 's 














& 


-^ 


cs 










— <s? 






■ 


-C 








■ &• 










— <& — 









/-T\ 



-<S>- 



* 



-cS'- 



-£?- 



£= 



-<!S>- 



-(S^^- 



-&> 0- 



■&- 



*=t=t 



-<S>- 



-&—<&-*2 (S 5 <S> <S>— T - 



<§- 



-<g »- 



tS 1 - 



-<§ — 1§ — «s- 



■&- 



-& — <s» — -&- 



-<S> & —6 

-0 



&- 



-0 — 



& £- 



-&- 



m 



72 



George C. Dobson's 
Home, sweet Home. (Song and Acct) 



Melody. 



4 <=._U5> — _© +— 


-* * ^ 


—9 <S> • -1 


-^ i» *f — ^^V - J 


<s- ii —9— 


— »-- 


r-<> 


-7T- * ~ 


a — ©>— #- =? 




•-. 


_•* — ^ ^ 0-.. 


1 






a ! 












1. 'Mid pleas - ures and pal - 

2. An ex - ile from home, 
Accompaniment. 


a - ces wher - e'er we may roam, Be it ev - er 
splen - dor daz - zles in vain, Oh 1 give me 


so 
my 


hum 
low 


ble, there's 
ly thatch'd 

-*■ g- 1 


k 




^ ^ ^ 


* # 


sb rb 7b 






j$ 


i— 7 


_^_^ • 


-,s> — 






— <S>— 


■ & * „ " 


©= - 




1— — 


^ 




— 9 9 ■ 




&- 


, 







-(5>- 



- ^ 7 7 



riS 1 - 



-<©>- 



-<©- 



-tS>- 



-!©»- 



no place like home; A charm 

cot - tage a - gain; The birds 



from the skies seems to hal - low 
sing - ing gai - ly that come at 



us there, 
my call, 



-G>- 



-&—&- 
-&—&- 



&-*$- 



1=1 



-&- 



-&—<2r 



-<£>—&- 



S 



&- 



-& 



-9 •■ 



-&- 



-&- 



J 



Which 
Give me 



-&- 



-<5>- 



-&- 



4 



-iS>- 



-&—T 



-<s>- 



-<5>- 



seek thro' the world 
these with the peace 



~« * 9- 



is ne'er met with elsewhere, 

of mind, dear - er than all. 



-9—9- 



-&- 






-&- 



t- 



^ 



-&■ 



Chorus. 
rr-© 5 



-7-7-7- 



- s h- a f- 



Home! 
Home ! 



home ! 
home! 



-7—7- 



I-g - 
:_i ^— ? -jy_ 



-&- 



-&- 



-7— 9- 



-<s>- 



-G>- 






sweet, sweet home, 



$ 



-s>- 



t__^_ 



-<s>- 
There's no 



-<5>- 



-(© S>— (&• 



-<S>- 



place like home, 



—&- 






-tS'- 



-i5>- 



There's no 



-&- 



place 



like home. 
— &- T 



- —&- 



^ 



Ifl 



-© 



]] 



The Best Method! 2d Edition Just Published! 





CEQQL ' 111B MMM 



in • r> p. phi nnatM iv; 

BY C. A. WHITE AND C. D. BLAKE. 

This unrivalled Method is placed upon the Market with confidence that it dJOXJibineS the Excellencies °* 

ail other Systems, Without their Faults. 

The System Of Instruction i 8 complete in all its details, especial attention being paid to Instruction in 
the Art 01 Combining the Stops to produce given effects. This feature is made unusually prominent. 

The Collections of Exercises, Voluntaries, Selections from Gems of Operas, Vocal Compositions and Recre- 
ations are undeniably select, and competent judges who have examined advance copies pronounce it to be 
without a rival. It is elegantly gotten up, and is offered at the low price, Post Free* °f 

$2.50, 

WITH A LIBERAL DISCOUNT TO IDE TRADE. 

WHITE, SMITH * COMPANY, 

516, XTew Number, Washington Street, Boston, Mass. 






I